Kusunoki Masashige

Kusunoki Masashige

▪ Japanese warrior
born 1294?, Japan
died July 4, 1336, Minato-gawa, Settsu province, Japan

      one of the greatest military strategists in Japanese history. Kusunoki's unselfish devotion and loyalty to the emperor have made him a legendary figure; after the imperial restoration of 1868, a splendid shrine was erected to him on the site of his death.

      The head of a small fief, in 1331 Kusunoki joined the emperor Go-Daigo (Daigo, Go-) in a revolt to wrest the power of government from the shogunate, the hereditary military dictatorship that had dominated Japan since 1192. Although the numerically stronger shogunate troops captured the emperor, Kusunoki escaped into the hilly countryside, where he continued the war using guerrilla tactics.

      Kusunoki's capture of the fortress of Chihaya near Nara in central Japan (in 1332) proved a major threat to the central government. The worried shogun then concentrated all his forces against Kusunoki, to the detriment of other parts of the country, where some warriors joined the rebel forces. In one of the most famous battles in Japanese history, Kusunoki successfully defended the fortress of Chihaya against the vastly superior shogunal forces.

      Finally, early in 1333 the emperor, encouraged by reports of victory, bribed his guards and escaped from captivity. Ashikaga Takauji, the man who had been sent to capture the emperor, changed sides, and Nitta Yoshisada, another loyalist leader, captured the shogun's capital at Kamakura, thus ending the rule of the Hōjō family, who controlled the shogunate.

      During the ensuing brief period of imperial rule, Kusunoki served as governor of the central Japanese provinces of Settsu, Kawachi, and Izumi and was a major figure in the central government. The real power in the countryside, however, continued to be held by the great hereditary lords, chiefly Ashikaga Takauji and Nitta Yoshisada, who openly vied to gain the loyalty of the minor feudal chieftains.

      In 1335 Go-Daigo sided with Nitta Yoshisada against Ashikaga Takauji. As head of the imperial forces, Kusunoki defeated Takauji's troops in January 1336 and forced him to flee the capital. A few months later, however, Takauji returned at the head of a large combined army and navy. Kusunoki suggested that they temporarily retreat so that they could fight Takauji's forces at a point where the terrain was more favourable. The emperor insisted that Kusunoki advance and meet the much larger enemy forces before they occupied the capital. In the final battle at the Minato River, near modern Kōbe, Kusunoki fought bravely for many hours, but his troops were finally overwhelmed, and he committed suicide rather than face capture.

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Universalium. 2010.

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