bucchero ware

bucchero ware

▪ Etruscan pottery
      Etruscan earthenware pottery common in pre-Roman Italy chiefly between about the 7th and early 5th century BC. Characteristically, the ware is black, sometimes gray, and often shiny from polishing. The colour was achieved by firing in an atmosphere charged with carbon monoxide instead of oxygen. This is known as a reducing firing, and it converts the red of the clay, due to the presence of iron oxide, to the typical bucchero colours. Although opinions vary about the precise times at which certain features of bucchero appeared, there is a scholarly consensus about the overall development of the ware. The finest products, the light, thin-walled bucchero sottile, appear to have been made in the 7th and early 6th centuries. In these wares technique is excellent, form tends to be refined and controlled, and decoration, usually incised or in relief, is generally subordinate to form. The shapes and motifs of the mid- to late 7th century are derived largely from Oriental models, especially metalwork imported from Phoenicia and Cyprus. In the 6th century the influence of the Greeks emerges and forms change: alabastrums, amphoras, kraters, kylikes, etc., decorated with incised, modelled, or applied birds and animals in friezes or in association with geometric schemes appear. Decoration is sometimes limited to continuous bands of narrative figure reliefs, like those on painted Greek vessels. These were produced by rolling a cylinder with a recessed design over the soft clay. Eventually the Greek black pigment came to be used. Stylized human and animal figures were painted on the surface of bucchero in black, red, and white; and the black-figure style was expertly copied. Technique and workmanship declined from about the mid-6th century onward, when bucchero sottile was replaced by bucchero pasantë, a heavy, thick-walled ware, overly complex in form and ostentatiously decorated with reliefs.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Нужно решить контрольную?

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bucchero — Eine etruskische Bucchero Oinochoe Bucchero [ˈbukkero] (italienisch, ursprünglich von portugiesisch bucáro „wohlriechende Tonerde“) ist eine Gattung schwarzer, außen glänzender …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • bucchero — /booh keuh roh , book euh /, n., pl. buccheros. an Etruscan black ceramic ware, often ornamented with incised geometrical patterns or figures carved in relief. [1885 90; < It < Sp búcaro < Pg: clay vessel, earlier púcaro < Mozarabic < L poculum… …   Universalium

  • Bichrome Ware — Anthromorphe Kanne der Bichrome Red II (V) Ware ; Zypro archaisch II (6. Jh. v. Chr.); Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Inv. Nr. V 1111 Mit dem modernen Fachbegriff Bichrome Ware bezeichnet man in der archäologischen Forschung Keramikgattungen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Black-on-Red-Ware — Kanne der zyprischen Black on Red II (IV) Ware; Zypro archaisch I (750 600 v. Chr.); Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Inv. Nr. IV 1530 Mit dem modernen Begriff Black on Red Ware bezeichnet man in der Forschung eine Form phönizischer und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Red-Slip-Ware — Kännchen der Red Slip Phoenician Ware; zyprisch archaisch I (7. Jh. v. Chr.); Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien Als Red Slip Ware bezeichnet man eine Keramikgattung mit rotem Überzug, die besonders in der phönizisch zypriotischen Eisenzeit produziert …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Samaria-Ware — Als Samaria Ware wird eine eisenzeitliche Keramikgattung der phönizischen Levante bezeichnet. Samaria Ware ist ein moderner Fachbegriff, der aufgrund von Funden der Keramik in der Stadt Samaria entstanden ist. Allerdings ist Samara ein… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • pottery — /pot euh ree/, n., pl. potteries. 1. ceramic ware, esp. earthenware and stoneware. 2. the art or business of a potter; ceramics. 3. a place where earthen pots or vessels are made. [1475 85; POTTER1 + Y3] * * * I One of the oldest and most… …   Universalium

  • Milawanda — Milet (ionisch: Μίλητος Miletos, dorisch: Μίλατος Milatos, äolisch: Μίλλατος Millatos, lateinisch: Miletus, hethitisch Millawanda), auch Palatia (Mittelalter) und Balat (Neuzeit) genannt, war eine antike Stadt an der Westküste Kleinasiens, in der …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Miletus — Milet (ionisch: Μίλητος Miletos, dorisch: Μίλατος Milatos, äolisch: Μίλλατος Millatos, lateinisch: Miletus, hethitisch Millawanda), auch Palatia (Mittelalter) und Balat (Neuzeit) genannt, war eine antike Stadt an der Westküste Kleinasiens, in der …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Millawanda — Milet (ionisch: Μίλητος Miletos, dorisch: Μίλατος Milatos, äolisch: Μίλλατος Millatos, lateinisch: Miletus, hethitisch Millawanda), auch Palatia (Mittelalter) und Balat (Neuzeit) genannt, war eine antike Stadt an der Westküste Kleinasiens, in der …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”