lustred glass

lustred glass
or lustered glass

Art glass of the Art Nouveau style, delicately iridescent with rich colours, mimicking the iridescent sheen produced by the corrosion of ancient buried glassware.

In 1893 Louis Comfort Tiffany founded the Stourbridge Glass Co. to produce lustred drinking glasses, bowls, vases, lamps, and jewelry. His lustred glass, produced by metallic pigments applied to opaque glass, produced a pearly sheen, whereas that produced in Europe in the 1870s used transparent glass, which resulted in a mirrorlike surface. Tiffany's wares were so popular that he made thousands of pieces annually until 1933.

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art
      art glass in the Art Nouveau style. It is a delicately iridescent glass with rich colours. Lustred glass was first produced in the United States by Louis Comfort Tiffany (Tiffany, Louis Comfort) during the late 1800s for use as windowpanes. The intention of the inventor of Tiffany lustred glass, Arthur J. Nash, was to recreate artificially the natural iridescent sheen produced by the corrosion of ancient buried glassware, such as that unearthed near Roman ruins. In 1893 Tiffany founded the Stourbridge Glass Company in Long Island, N.Y., to produce decorative lustred glassware, including drinking glasses, bowls, vases, lamps, and jewelry. Because of the tremendous popularity of this glassware, known by the trade name Favrile glass, the Stourbridge firm and other Tiffany companies continued to make thousands of lustred glass articles annually until 1933.

      Although Tiffany lustred glass was inspired by the metallized glassware produced in the 1870s in Paris and Vienna, it differed from the European variety in that it had a pearl-like sheen rather than a mirrorlike finish. This variation resulted largely from differences in the type and colour of the glass to which the metallic lustre pigments were applied. On transparent glass, such as was used in Europe, the effect is a brilliant iridescence, but on opaque glass, which Tiffany employed, the effect is a soft, satiny sheen. Lustre applied to glass that is both transparent and yellow in colour produces gold, while transparent cobalt-blue glass sandwiched between two layers of transparent yellow glass turns to a deep and iridescent blue when lustred.

      Among Tiffany's more intricately and lavishly lustred wares is a textured variety. The textured surface was created by rolling glass, while still hot, over multicoloured crushed glass and by inducing and breaking bubbles on its surface. In another elaborate form of lustred ware, the opaque glass body is decorated with threads or patches of both transparent and coloured glass that produce contrasting effects of brilliance and subdued sheen when coated with a metallic compound.

      See also Art Nouveau.

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Universalium. 2010.

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