biblical source

biblical source
Any of the original oral or written materials compiled as the Bible.

While authorship of many biblical books is anonymous or pseudonymous, scholars have used internal evidence and the tools of biblical criticism to identify sources and arrange them in chronological order of composition. There are four sources for the Pentateuch: J (sources in which God is called YHWH, German JHVH), eastern (sources in which God is called Elohim), D (sources in the style of Deuteronomy), and P (for sources with priestly style and content). Parts of lost books have also been identified in the Old Testament. New Testament sources include original writings and oral traditions. The first three (synoptic) Gospels have a common source, Matthew and Luke being based on Mark and a lost source called Q; John conveys an independent tradition. Biblical sources are studied to uncover the history of the scriptures and to restore texts as closely as possible to their original content. Scholars may also analyze biblical sources in an effort to reconstruct the oral tradition behind them.

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▪ biblical interpretation
      any of the original oral or written materials that, in compilation, came to constitute the Bible of Judaism and Christianity. Most of the writings in the Old Testament are of anonymous authorship, and in many cases it is not known whether they were compiled by individuals or by groups. Nevertheless, by careful evaluation of internal evidence and with the aid of various schools of biblical criticism (q.v.), scholars have been able to identify certain sources and to arrange them chronologically in order of composition.

      The means by which the basic sources of the Pentateuch were distinguished and their chronology established provided the first clear picture of Israel's literary and religious development. The names by which these sources are now known, in chronological order, are: the Yahwist, or J, source, so called because it employed as the Lord's name a Hebrew word transliterated into English as YHWH (called J from the German: JHVH) and spoken as “Yahweh”; the Elohist (Elohist source), or E, source, distinguished by its reference to the Lord as Elohim; the Deuteronomist, or D, source, marked by distinctive vocabulary and style; and the Priestly code, or P, source, which contains detailed ritual instructions.

      Numerous other sources for the Old Testament have subsequently been identified, including two of the earliest books of Hebrew literature, not now extant, parts of which are embedded in the early narratives. These, the “Book of the Wars of Yahweh” and the “Book of Yashar” (the Upright), were probably poetic in form.

      The New Testament sources consist of the original writings that constitute the Christian Scriptures, together with the oral tradition that preceded them. The first three Gospels are referred to as synoptic (Synoptic Gospels); i.e., they have a common source. Contemporary opinion holds that Mark served as a source for Matthew and Luke and that the latter two also share another common source, called Q (after the German word Quelle, “source”), consisting mainly of Jesus' sayings. The Gospel of John apparently represents an independent line of transmission.

      Whereas most of the Old Testament authors are anonymous, the major New Testament sources are known, and the essential task in their study is to restore the texts as closely as possible to the original autographs. The main sources of evidence are: manuscripts of the New Testament in Greek dating from the 2nd to the 15th century AD (some 5,000 are known); early versions in other languages, such as Syriac, Coptic, Latin, Armenian, and Georgian; and quotations from the New Testament by early Christian writers.

      These sources are collectively referred to as “witnesses.” Authoritative Bibles in contemporary translation are usually based on an eclectic text in which the witnesses show variant readings. In such cases, the reading that best suits the context and the author's known style is preferred.

      Attempts to go beyond the original writings to reconstruct the oral tradition behind them are the province of the form of biblical criticism known as tradition criticism. Recent scholars have attempted with this method to recover the actual words (ipsissima verba) of Jesus by removing the accretions attached to them in the course of transmission.

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Universalium. 2010.

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