Spanish Netherlands

Spanish Netherlands
Spanish-held provinces in the southern Low Countries (roughly corresponding to modern Belgium and Luxembourg).

In 1578 the diplomat Alessandro Farnese was sent to represent Spain in the Netherlands, and by 1585 he had reestablished Spanish control over the southern provinces, ending the union with the northern provinces that followed the Pacification of Ghent. In the 17th century the region saw a resurgence of economic and intellectual growth. As a buffer between Protestant and Catholic states, the region was the scene of constant warfare; areas were ceded to the Dutch Republic (1648) and France (1659). The territory began to decline in the late 17th century. Spanish control was lost after the War of the Spanish Succession, when the region passed to Emperor Charles VI and became the Austrian Netherlands.

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▪ historical province, Europe
      (c. 1579–1713), Spanish-held provinces located in the southern part of the Low Countries (roughly corresponding to present Belgium and Luxembourg).

      Although the provinces of the Low Countries had for some years and for many reasons been chafing under foreign rule, the revolt against Spain received its major impetus from the zeal of members of the nascent Calvinist movement. It was to quell their insurrection that Fernando Álvarez de Toledo y Pimental, duque (duke) de Alba, was sent in 1567. His harsh, repressive measures (see Troubles, Council of) and heavy taxation met with immediate resistance. King Philip II, recognizing his mistake, recalled the hated Alba in 1573. Although the largely Roman Catholic southern provinces had remained loyal to Spain to this time, an active Protestant movement and the growing desire to be autonomous influenced them to join in a united resistance to Spain. In 1576 delegates from the union of northern and southern provinces, known collectively as the States General, met and issued the Pacification of Ghent (see Ghent, Pacification of). Yet within three years it was apparent that the religious truce would not hold. The differences between the agrarian, Roman Catholic south and the commercial–industrial, Calvinist-dominated north were too great. In addition, the Spanish king had chosen as his representative Alessandro Farnese (Farnese, Alessandro, duke of Parma and Piacenza) (later duke of Parma), well known for his diplomatic and military skills. By emphasizing Roman Catholic unity and showing moderation in his treatment of the Protestants in the south, he regained the confidence of the southern provinces and reestablished Spanish control over them; by 1585 the union of the northern and southern Low Countries was over.

      Despite the warfare and confusion, the Spanish Netherlands experienced a resurgence of economic and intellectual growth in the early 17th century. The linen industry quickly recovered from the Spanish reconquest and soon surpassed its former production levels. Flemish painting flourished in the hands of Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, and others. The major cities of Ghent and Bruges grew rapidly. Agriculture advanced through the digging of canals and the introduction of new crops and harvesting methods, and prosperity continued into the mid-17th century.

      Although the southern provinces were far from independent, they did experience a considerable degree of freedom in internal affairs. They controlled their own judiciary system and set up councils to aid the governor general. They also enjoyed the privileges established with the Joyeuse Entrée (q.v.). Foreign affairs, however, were strictly the domain of the Spanish throne.

      Beset on all sides, the Spanish Netherlands was the scene of constant warfare. It was in the unfortunate position of being a buffer between Protestant and Roman Catholic states. Consequently, it was mercilessly carved up. Northern Brabant, Zeeland, and the region east of the Meuse River was ceded to the United Provinces (Dutch Republic) in 1648. The county of Artois was taken by France in 1659, to be followed later by large southern portions of Hainaut, Luxembourg, and Flanders. In 1648 the Peace of Münster closed the flourishing port of Antwerp to foreign trade.

      Under these conditions, the territory began to decline. Spanish control was lost when Charles II of Spain died without issue (1700), naming Philip, duc d'Anjou of France as his successor (as Philip V). The Spanish Netherlands was ruled for six years by Bourbon France and occupied for another seven by British and Dutch troops. In 1713 the Treaties of Utrecht (Utrecht, treaties of) divided the Spanish inheritance, and rule of the Spanish Netherlands passed to the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI and the Austrian Habsburgs (see Austrian Netherlands).

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Universalium. 2010.

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