Ḥusaynid dynasty

Ḥusaynid dynasty
Ruling dynasty of Tunisia (1705–1957).

The dynasty was founded by an officer of the Ottoman Empire, al-Ḥusayn ibn ʽAlī. He was allowed to rule autonomously and made treaties with European powers. European pressure led later Ḥusaynid rulers to suppress piracy (1819), abolish slavery, and ease restrictions on Jews (1837–55). When Tunisia became a French protectorate in 1883, Ḥusaynid rulers became mere figureheads. The monarchy was abolished when Tunisia gained its independence in 1957.

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▪ Tunisian history
      the ruling dynasty of Tunisia from 1705 until the establishment of the Republic of Tunisia in 1957.

      Al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAlī, an Ottoman officer, was proclaimed bey in 1705 after the Algerians captured the former ruler of Tunis. He received legal recognition by the Ottoman sultan as governor (beylerbeyi) of the province and assured the survival of his line by promulgating a law of succession in 1710. Al-Ḥusayn conducted his affairs without Ottoman interference and with a measure of independence that allowed him to maintain separate treaties with France (1710; 1728), Great Britain (1716), Spain (1720), Austria (1725), and Holland (1728).

      Intermittent internal struggles for succession and difficulties with the French marred subsequent Ḥusaynid history. In 1756 the Algerians occupied Tunis and beheaded ʿAlī Bey (reigned 1735–56). Ḥammūda Bey (reigned 1782–1814) severed ties with Venice after its attacks on the Tunisian coastal towns of Sousse (1784) and La Goulette (1785). He also faced two Algerian invasions (1807; 1813) and a revolt of the Janissaries (Janissary) in 1811, which forced him to disband the elite Ottoman military corps periodically recruited to supplement the local armies.

      Their European alliances made the Ḥusaynid beys subject to European pressures in the 19th century. Privateering, an important source of Tunisian revenue, was suppressed at European insistence in 1819; slavery and restrictions on Tunisian Jews were abolished under Aḥmad Bey (reigned 1837–55). The Ottoman government also sought to curb Tunisian autonomy, but Aḥmad Bey refused to pay tribute.

      Western-style reforms—including tax reform, modernization of the army, and the establishment of monopolies—followed in the second half of the 19th century but led the country into serious debt and economic crisis. With the imposition of a French protectorate over Tunisia in 1883, the Ḥusaynids receded into a purely figurative role. During World War II Munṣif Bey (reigned June 1942–May 1943) briefly became leader of the nationalist movement, but the dynasty proved unable to regain any real power. It came to an end with the proclamation of a Tunisian republic (July 25, 1957).

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Universalium. 2010.

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