coeducation

coeducation
/koh'ej oo kay"sheuhn/, n.
the joint education of both sexes at the same institution and in the same classes.
[1850-55, Amer.; CO- + EDUCATION]

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Education of males and females in the same school.

A modern phenomenon, it was adopted earlier and more widely in the U.S. than in Europe, where tradition proved a greater obstacle to its acceptance. In the 17th century Quaker and other reformers in Scotland, northern England, and New England began urging that girls as well as boys be taught to read the Bible. By the later 18th century girls were being admitted to town schools. By 1900 most U.S. public high schools and some 70% of colleges and universities were coeducational. Pioneering institutions in the U.S. included Oberlin College, Cornell University, and the University of Iowa. In Europe the Universities of Bologna and London and various Scandinavian institutions were the first to open their doors. Other European countries adopted coeducational policies after 1900, and many communist countries instituted strong coeducational programs.

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      education of males and females in the same schools. A modern phenomenon, it was adopted earlier and more widely in the United States than in Europe, where tradition proved a greater obstacle.

      Coeducation was first introduced in western Europe after the Reformation, when certain Protestant (Protestantism) groups urged that girls as well as boys should be taught to read the Bible. The practice became especially marked in Scotland, the northern parts of England, and colonial New England, where young children of both sexes attended dame schools. In the latter half of the 18th century, girls were gradually admitted to town schools. The Society of Friends (Friends, Society of) in England as well as in the United States were pioneers in coeducation as they were in universal education, and, in Quaker settlements in the British colonies, boys and girls generally attended school together. The new free public elementary, or common, schools, which after the American Revolution supplanted church institutions, were almost always coeducational, and by 1900 most public high schools were coeducational as well. Many private colleges from their inception admitted women (the first was Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio), and many state universities followed their example. By the end of the 19th century, 70 percent of American colleges were coeducational. In the second half of the 20th century, many institutions of higher learning that had been exclusively for persons of one sex became coeducational.

      In western Europe the main exponents of primary and secondary coeducation were the Scandinavian (Scandinavia) countries. In Denmark coeducation extends back to the 18th century, and in Norway coeducation was adopted by law in 1896. In Germany, on the other hand, until the closing decades of the 19th century it was practically impossible for a girl to get a secondary education, and, when girls' secondary schools were introduced, their status was inferior to that of schools for boys. At present in many large municipalities, such as Bremen, Hamburg, and Berlin, coeducation at the primary level is the rule; at the secondary level there has been little change.

      Antagonism to coeducation in England (United Kingdom) and on the European continent diminished more rapidly in higher education than in secondary. In England, Girton College at Cambridge was established for women in 1869, and the London School of Economics was opened to women in 1874. Germany permitted women to matriculate in 1901, and by 1910 women had been admitted to universities in The Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Austria-Hungary, France, and Turkey.

      Since World War II, coeducation has been adopted in many developing countries; China and Cuba are outstanding examples. There are many other countries, however, where social conditioning and religious sanctions have limited its success. In most Arab countries, for example, girls tend to drop out of coeducational schools at the age of puberty.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Coeducation — Coéducation La coéducation est un concept pédagogique qui peut avoir plusieurs significations. Sommaire 1 Coéducation mixité 2 Coéducation globale 3 Notes 4 Voir aussi …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Coeducation — Co*ed u*ca tion (?; 135), n. An educating together, of different sexes or races; now used almost exclusively in reference to the education males and females together. [WordNet 1.5 +PJC] {Co*ed u*ca tion*al}, a. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Coeducation — (engl., spr. ko edjukēsch n), gemeinsamer Unterricht für Knaben u. Mädchen; s. Gesamtschulen …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • coéducation — [koedykɑsjɔ̃; kɔedykɑsjɔ̃] n. f. ÉTYM. 1877; de co , et éducation. ❖ ♦ Éducation, dans un même établissement, de garçons et de filles. ⇒ Mixité …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • coeducation — ☆ coeducation [kō΄ej΄ə kā′shən ] n. an educational system in which students of both sexes attend classes together coeducational adj. coeducationally adv …   English World dictionary

  • Coéducation — La coéducation est un concept pédagogique qui peut avoir plusieurs significations. Sommaire 1 Coéducation mixité 2 Coéducation globale 3 Notes 4 Voir aussi …   Wikipédia en Français

  • coeducation — n. the education of pupils of both sexes together. Derivatives: coeducational adj. * * * /koh ej oo kay sheuhn/, n. the joint education of both sexes at the same institution and in the same classes. [1850 55, Amer.; CO + EDUCATION] * * *… …   Useful english dictionary

  • coéducation — (entrée créée par le supplément) (ko é du ka sion) s. f. Néologisme. Éducation en commun. La coéducation des sexes aux États Unis …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

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  • coeducation — noun Date: 1852 the education of students of both sexes at the same institution • coeducational adjective • coeducationally adverb …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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