cockle

cockle
cockle1
/kok"euhl/, n., v., cockled, cockling.
n.
1. any bivalve mollusk of the genus Cardium, having somewhat heart-shaped, radially ribbed valves, esp. C. edule, the common edible species of Europe.
2. any of various allied or similar mollusks.
3. cockleshell (defs. 1, 2).
4. a wrinkle; pucker: a cockle in fabric.
5. a small, crisp candy of sugar and flour, bearing a motto.
6. cockles of one's heart, the depths of one's emotions or feelings: The happy family scene warmed the cockles of his heart.
v.i.
7. to contract into wrinkles; pucker: This paper cockles easily.
8. to rise in short, irregular waves; ripple: The waves cockled along the shore.
v.t.
9. to cause to wrinkle, pucker, or ripple: The wind cockled the water.
[1350-1400; ME cokille < MF coqille < VL *cocchilia, L conchylia, pl. of CONCHYLIUM < Gk konchýlion, equiv. to konchýl(e) mussel + -ion dim. suffix; cf. OE -cocc, in sae-cocc lit., sea-cockle < VL *coccus for L concha CONCH]
cockle2
/kok"euhl/, n.
a weed, as the darnel Lolium temulentum, or rye grass, L. perenne.
[bef. 1000; ME; OE coccel]

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or heart clam

Any of approximately 250 species (family Cardiidae) of marine bivalves distributed worldwide.

They range in diameter from about 0.5 in. (1 cm) to about 6 in. (15 cm). The two valves of the shell are equal in size and shape and range in colour from brown to red or yellow. Most species live just below the low-tide line, though some have been obtained from depths of more than 1,500 ft (500 m) or in the intertidal zone. Many species are marketed commercially for their meat.

Great heart cockle (Dinocardium robustum)

Harry Rogers

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also called  heart clam 
 any of the approximately 250 species of marine bivalve mollusks, or clams, of the family Cardiidae. Distributed worldwide, they range from about one centimetre (0.4 inch) in diameter to about 15 centimetres (about 6 inches)—the size of the smooth giant cockle (Laevicardium elatum) of California.

      The two valves of the shell are equal in size and shape, and range in colour from brown to red or yellow. Those of many species are quite smooth; others have ribs radiating from the hinge area between the shells.

      Most species live just below the low-tide line; some have been obtained from depths of more than 500 metres (1,500 feet), and a few live in the intertidal zone. All are found in sandy or muddy areas shallowly buried to a depth of not more than three centimetres (about one inch).

      The breeding season of most species lasts several months. Eggs and sperm are shed into the sea, where fertilization occurs. The young larvae develop shells and swim freely for a time before metamorphosing on the bottom. Cockles feed on microscopic organisms that they collect from the water.

      The average marketable cockle is about 2.5 centimetres (one inch) long and two or three years old. The meat, which is usually sold fresh or preserved in salt or vinegar, is sometimes eaten raw; when canned, the meat is commonly eaten as hors d'oeuvres. Cockles are also eaten by shore birds, bottom-feeding fishes, and starfishes.

      Cerastoderma (Cardium) edulis, an important food in Britain and western Europe, is gathered by hand or with rakes or scrapers. Other edible cockles include the large basket cockle (Clinocardium nuttalli), which is taken in Puget Sound and Washington state; and the torgai (Papyridea [Fulvia] mutica) of Japan.

      Common species on the Atlantic coast of North America include the prickly cockle (Trachycardium egmontianum), which grows to a width of 6 centimetres; the yellow cockle (T. muricatum), 5 centimetres; the Atlantic strawberry cockle (Americardia media), 2.5 centimetres; and the great heart cockle (Dinocardium robustum), 15 centimetres.

      Common species on the Pacific coast of North America include the giant Pacific cockle (Trachycardium quadragenarium), which attains a diameter of 15 centimetres; the common Pacific egg cockle (Laevicardium substriatum), 2 centimetres; the giant Pacific egg cockle (L. elatum), 15 centimetres; and the fucan cockle (Clinocardium fucanum), 2.5 centimetres. Members of the genus Clinocardium have beaks that point sharply forward; those of Trachycardium have spined ribs; and those of Laevicardium have valves with smooth margins.

      About 10 cockle species occur in the coastal waters of Britain. The spiny, or red-nose, cockle (Acanthocardium aculeata) is found on the south Devon coast and attains diameters of up to 10 centimetres. The prickly cockle (A. echinata) is smaller and more widely distributed.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Cockle — Coc kle (k[o^]k k l), n. [OE. cockes cockles, AS. s[=ae]coccas sea cockles, prob, from Celtic; cf. W. cocs cockles, Gael. cochull husk. Perh. influenced by F. coquille shell, a dim. from the root of E. conch. Cf. {Coach}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A bivalve …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cockle — cockle1 [käk′əl] n. [ME cokel < OFr coquille, a blister, shell, cockle, altered (infl. by coq, COCK1) < L conchylium < Gr konchylion, shellfish < konchē: see CONCH] 1. any of a family (Cardiidae) of edible, marine bivalve mollusks… …   English World dictionary

  • Cockle — Coc kle, n. [AS. coccel, cocel; cf. Gael. cogall tares, husks, cockle.] (Bot.) (a) A plant or weed that grows among grain; the corn rose ({Luchnis Githage}). (b) The {Lotium}, or darnel. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cockle — may refer to: Cockle (bivalve), a group of edible saltwater clams (marine molluscs) Lolium temulentum, a tufted grass plant Berwick cockles, a confectionery from Scotland Cockleshell The Mark II canoes used in Operation Frankton in 1942 The… …   Wikipedia

  • Cockle — Coc kle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cockled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cockling}.] [Of uncertian origin.] To cause to contract into wrinkles or ridges, as some kinds of cloth after a wetting. [1913 Webster] {Cockling sea}, waves dashing against each other with …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cockle — ► NOUN 1) an edible burrowing bivalve mollusc with a strong ribbed shell. 2) (also cockleshell) literary a small shallow boat. ● warm the cockles of one s heart Cf. ↑warm the cockles of one s heart DERIVATIVES …   English terms dictionary

  • cockle — [14] The cockle is related etymologically to another mollusc, the conch: they both began life in Greek kónkhē – which meant ‘mussel’ as well as ‘conch’. From this was formed the diminutive konkhúlion ‘small variety of conch’ – hence ‘cockle’. The …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • cockle — [14] The cockle is related etymologically to another mollusc, the conch: they both began life in Greek kónkhē – which meant ‘mussel’ as well as ‘conch’. From this was formed the diminutive konkhúlion ‘small variety of conch’ – hence ‘cockle’. The …   Word origins

  • Cockle — This name has two possible derivations, the first from the early Medieval English or Olde French cokille which means a shell or cockle . This surname may have been applied to pilgrims to the Shrine of St. James of Compostella who sewed shells on… …   Surnames reference

  • cockle — dirvinė raugė statusas T sritis vardynas apibrėžtis Gvazdikinių šeimos vaistinis nuodingas augalas (Agrostemma githago), paplitęs Europoje ir šiaurės Afrikoje. atitikmenys: lot. Agrostemma githago angl. cockle; common corn cockle; corn cockle;… …   Lithuanian dictionary (lietuvių žodynas)

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