change ringing

change ringing
the art of ringing a series of tuned bells of different tones, as those hung in a church tower, according to any of various orderly sequences.
[1870-75]

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Traditional English art of ringing tower or hand bells in a succession of different orders.

Groups of swinging bells in English church towers date from the 10th century. Control of bell ringing was much enhanced with the invention of the bell wheel in the 14th century; further improvements in bearings and fittings allowed the bells to swing at the same speed and led to recognizably modern change ringing by the 17th century. A "ring" (set) of 6 bells can be tolled in 720 different "changes" (orders); 8 bells allow 40,320 different changes, and 10 bells allow more than 3,000,000. In practice, only a selection of the possible changes is rung, derived by a "method" (a shuffling algorithm), usually involving switching pairs of bells in a certain order (e.g., 123456 becomes 214365, which can then become 241635, etc.). "Rounds"
all the bells in order from highest to lowest
is rung before and after a method is completed.

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▪ English music
      traditional English art of ringing a set of tower bells in an intricate series of changes, or mathematical permutations (different orderings in the ringing sequence), by pulling ropes attached to bell wheels. On five, six, or seven bells, a peal is the maximum number of permutations (orderings) possible (120, 720, and 5,040, respectively); on more than seven bells, the full extent of possible changes is impracticable, so that 5,000 or more changes are said to constitute a peal. On 3 bells, only 6 changes, or variations, in the order 1 × 2 × 3 can be produced; on 5 bells, 1 × 2 × 3 × 4 × 5 = 120; and so on, up to the astronomical total of 479,001,600 changes on 12 bells. A touch is any number short of a peal.

      In ringing a peal, no bell moves more than one place forward or backward in the ringing order in each successive change, nor is it repeated or omitted, nor is any sequence (change) repeated. A set, or ring, of 4 bells is known as minimus, or singles; 5, doubles; 6, minor; 7, triples; 8, major; 9, caters; 10, royal; 11, cinques; and 12, maximus. A complete peal of 4 bells (24 changes), requires about 30 seconds; one of 12 bells (479,001,600 changes), about 40 years. A system of permutation is called a method; the entire ringing fraternity, the exercise.

      Groups of swinging bells in English church towers date from the 10th century, and, at least by the 15th, orderly ringing took place involving changing note patterns. This practice evolved from first rendering descending scales (called rounds). The practice was stimulated by the Reformation in England, and it remains particularly associated with the Anglican church. By the 17th century, intricate mathematical formulas had evolved.

      Change ringing was originally a gentleman's recreation. Its early participants, aristocrats and intelligentsia, often students, were later joined by ecclesiastics, labourers, and others. Women were excluded, and participation was a mark of social status. The first society, or ringing organization, the Ancient Society of College Youths, was founded in 1637. The earliest treatises on the subject were Fabian Stedman's Tintinnalogia (1668) and his Campanologia (1677), which introduced his Grandsire Method and his Stedman's Principle (a method).

      When swung, change-ringing bells rotate slightly less than 360°. A bell is gradually swung back and forth until it reaches a nearly vertical balance position with the mouth of the bell uppermost. Handstroke (a pull on the rope that rotates the bell almost 360° to the other balance position) alternates with backstroke (a pull on the rope that returns the bell to its initial position), two successive revolutions constituting a whole pull.

      Change-ringing bells are relatively short waisted, with their axis at the middle of the waist for easier swinging. They are tuned in just intonation (pitches derived from certain ratios rather than from equal division of the octave). Until the end of the 19th century, tuning of their partials (component tones in the overtone series) was not seriously undertaken and so lacked uniformity. The largest and last bell in a ring is the tenor; the smallest, the treble. Most tenor bells range from several hundred pounds to two tons; that of the Cathedral Church of Christ, Liverpool, weighs 4.6 tons (about 4.2 metric tons).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Change ringing — Change Change, n. [F. change, fr. changer. See {Change}. v. t.] 1. Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles. [1913 Webster] Apprehensions of a change… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • change-ringing — n. ringing tuned bells in a fixed order that is continually changing. See {change[9]}, n. [WordNet 1.5] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • change ringing — n. the act of ringing a series of different changes on a set of bells tuned together …   English World dictionary

  • change-ringing — see ↑ring the changes below. • • • Main Entry: ↑change …   Useful english dictionary

  • Change ringing — Triples redirects here. For other uses, see Triple (disambiguation). Bell ringing practice in Stoke Gabriel parish church, Devon, England Change ringing is the art of ringing a set of tuned bells in a series of mathematical patterns called… …   Wikipedia

  • Change Ringing — Wechselläuten (auch Variationsläuten, engl. Change Ringing) ist eine hauptsächlich im angelsächsischen Kulturraum verbreitete Kunstform des Glockenläutens. Drei bis zwölf, manchmal mehr, selten aber über sechzehn Glocken werden reihum geläutet,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Change ringing — Wechselläuten (auch Variationsläuten, engl. Change Ringing) ist eine hauptsächlich im angelsächsischen Kulturraum verbreitete Kunstform des Glockenläutens. Drei bis zwölf, manchmal mehr, selten aber über sechzehn Glocken werden reihum geläutet,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • change ringing — noun ringing tuned bells in a fixed order that is continually changing • Hypernyms: ↑bell ringing, ↑carillon, ↑carillon playing * * * noun : the art or practice of ringing a set of tuned bells in continually varying order in such a way as to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • change ringing — change′ ring ing n. mad the art of ringing changes in various sequences on a peal of bells • Etymology: 1870–75 …   From formal English to slang

  • change-ringing — noun the ringing of sets of church bells or handbells in a constantly varying order. Derivatives change ringer noun …   English new terms dictionary

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