Yama-no-kami

Yama-no-kami

▪ Japanese religion
      in Japanese popular religion, any of numerous gods of the mountains. These kami are of two kinds: (1) gods who rule over mountains and are venerated by hunters, woodcutters, and charcoal burners and (2) gods who rule over agriculture and are venerated by farmers. Chief among them is Ō-yama-tsumi-no-mikoto, born from the fire god who was cut into pieces by his angry father Izanagi (see Ho-musubi). Another prominent mountain deity is Ko-no-hana-saku-ya-hime—wife of the divine grandchild Ninigi and mother of two mythological princes, Fireshade and Fireshine—who resides on Fuji-yama. A widespread tradition connected with the worship of Yama-no-kami is the offering of a salt-sea fish called okoze.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Yama-no-Kami — Yama no Kami(山の神) is the name given to a kami of the mountains in the Shinto religion of Japan. These can be of two different types. The first type is a god of the mountains who is worshipped by hunters, woodcutters, and charcoal burners. The… …   Wikipedia

  • Yama-no-kami —    Mountain kami. One meaning is a mountain deity worshipped by those whose work takes them into mountain areas (traditionally hunters, charcoal burners and woodcutters), in which case the deity is identified with Oyama tsumi or Kono hana saku ya …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Yama-miya —    Mountain shrine. A shrine established on the summit or side of a mountain where the mountain is regarded as the kami or its shintai. The yamamiya may also be called the okumiya as opposed to a satomiya more conveniently located. The yamamiya… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Ō-yama-tsu-mi-no-kami — Ōyamatsumi (jap. オオヤマツミ (Kojiki: 大山津見神; Nihonshoki: 大山祇〔神〕); von Karl Florenz übersetzt mit „Großer Berg Herr“) ist der oberste Berg Kami des Shintō, der entstand, als Izanagi und Izanami nach den Flüssen und Seen die Landmassen gebaren. Einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ō-yama-tsu-mi — Ōyamatsumi (jap. オオヤマツミ (Kojiki: 大山津見神; Nihonshoki: 大山祇〔神〕); von Karl Florenz übersetzt mit „Großer Berg Herr“) ist der oberste Berg Kami des Shintō, der entstand, als Izanagi und Izanami nach den Flüssen und Seen die Landmassen gebaren. Einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ōyamatsumi no kami — Ōyamatsumi (jap. オオヤマツミ (Kojiki: 大山津見神; Nihonshoki: 大山祇〔神〕); von Karl Florenz übersetzt mit „Großer Berg Herr“) ist der oberste Berg Kami des Shintō, der entstand, als Izanagi und Izanami nach den Flüssen und Seen die Landmassen gebaren. Einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ta-no-kami —    The kami of the rice fields, i.e. kami of agriculture, known throughout Japan under different regional names; in Tohoku nogami, in Nakano and Yamanashi sakugami, in the Kyoto Osaka area tsukuri kami, in the Inland Sea area jigami, in Kyushu… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto

  • Hi-no-kami — Kagutsuchi (jap. カグツチ (Kojiki: Kagu tsuchi no kami (迦具土神), Kagutsuchi no mikoto, Hinoyagihayao no kami; Nihonshoki: Kagu tsuchi no mikoto (軻遇突智 (命)), Ho musuhi; weitere Namen siehe unten) ist der Kami des Feuers in der Mythologie des Shintō.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hi no kami — Kagutsuchi (jap. カグツチ (Kojiki: Kagu tsuchi no kami (迦具土神), Kagutsuchi no mikoto, Hinoyagihayao no kami; Nihonshoki: Kagu tsuchi no mikoto (軻遇突智 (命)), Ho musuhi; weitere Namen siehe unten) ist der Kami des Feuers in der Mythologie des Shintō.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Kunimi-yama — Kunimi (jap. 国見, dt. „Blick in die Provinz/das Land“) bezeichnet: mehrere Berge (Liste beschränkt auf min. 500 m Höhe) und Gipfel: in der Provinz Fukushima (564 m): Kunimi yama (Fukushima) in der Präfektur Kagoshima (887 m): Kunimi yama… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”