Nicholson, William

Nicholson, William

▪ English chemist and inventor
born 1753, London, Eng.
died May 21, 1815, Bloomsbury, London

      English chemist, discoverer of the electrolysis of water, which has become a basic process in both chemical research and industry.

      Nicholson was at various times a hydraulic engineer, inventor, translator, and scientific publicist. He invented a hydrometer (an instrument for measuring the density of liquids) in 1790. In 1800, after he heard of the invention of the electric battery by the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta, he built one of his own. He then discovered that when leads from the battery are placed in water, the water breaks up into hydrogen and oxygen, which collect separately to form bubbles at the submerged ends of the wires. With this discovery Nicholson became the first man to produce a chemical reaction by electricity.

      In 1797 Nicholson founded the Journal of Natural Philosophy, Chemistry and the Arts, which was the first independent scientific journal. The success of this periodical inspired the creation of several rival scientific journals in England that eventually drove Nicholson's periodical out of business. Nicholson's Introduction to Natural Philosophy (1781) was the most successful of his published works.

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Universalium. 2010.

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