musical societies and institutions

musical societies and institutions

music
      organizations formed for the promotion or performance of music, usually with some common factor. The German guilds of Meistersingers (meistersinger) (“master singers”) flourished from the 14th to the 16th century, and the earlier French guilds of troubadours were associated with secular music, whereas groups such as the Compagnia de Gonfalone (Rome, 1264) and the Confrérie de la Passion (Paris, 1402) were formed for the performance of sacred music. During the Renaissance in France and Italy, academies were formed for the encouragement of poetry and music, the best known being in Paris, Florence, Venice, and Bologna; Florentine Camerata were responsible for the production of the first operas.

      In the 17th and 18th centuries the institution of the Collegium Musicum, deriving from an earlier institution, the Convivia Musica, was associated with German and Swiss universities; its aim was to organize public concerts. Early concert societies in London were the Academy of Ancient Music (1710), the Anacreontic Society (1766), and the Catch Club (1761). In Paris the most important concert-giving society in the 18th century was Le Concert Spirituel, founded by the French composer Anne Philidor in 1725. Its rival, the Concerts des Amateurs, was founded in 1770. In Vienna the Tonkünstler Societät was formed in 1771. Choral music was fostered by the foundation of the Singakademie (Berlin, 1791). Concert societies were also formed during the 18th century in Bergen, Nor.; Stockholm; and Copenhagen.

      During the 19th century, music societies expanded considerably. They included concert societies such as the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (“Society of Friends of Music”), founded 1812 in Vienna; the Parisian Société Philharmonique, founded by the composer Hector Berlioz in 1850; and the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, founded in 1828. Amateur choir societies sprang up in England during the century; the most important were the Royal Choral Society (1871) and the Bach Choir (1875).

      In the mid-19th century, scholars began to publish editions of earlier composers. Societies were formed to study and perform the work of particular composers (e.g., the Bach-Gesellschaft, 1850; the Purcell Society, 1876), whose music was produced in authoritative and authentic editions.

      With the rise of nationalism in the middle of the 19th century, societies came into existence that promoted the printing and performance of national music. The study of folk music was allied to this, and such institutions as the International Folk Music Council came into being. The promotion of new music was fostered by such organizations as the International Society for Contemporary Music, which was formed in 1922. Musicological research was published by organizations such as the Royal Musical Association (England, 1874) and the American Musicological Society (1934). Groups such as the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) protect the copyrights of authors and composers. The American Society of Ancient Instruments (1922), the Society of Recorder Players (England, 1937), and other organizations promote older music.

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Universalium. 2010.

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