medicinal poisoning

medicinal poisoning
also called  Drug Poisoning,  

      harmful effects on health of certain therapeutic drugs, resulting either from overdose or from the sensitivity of specific body tissues to regular doses (side effects).

      Until about the 1920s, there were few effective medications at the disposal of the physician. By mid-century, however, a vast array of synthetic chemical agents had come into use as medicines, and many of these were undeniably potent, therapeutically beneficial, and, in many cases, unquestionably dangerous.

      Commonly, the margin between dose and overdose is fairly narrow; what was intended as a curative dose may in fact prove toxic in certain people or over time.

      In the United States and some other countries, a series of safeguards have been adopted to avoid medicinal poisoning. First, a new drug is subjected to pharmacological and toxicity testing in large numbers of animals, and its actions and limitations are provisionally assessed. Next, it is given in successive doses to volunteers, whose responses are carefully checked. Then it undergoes clinical trials in patients. Only after this stage is it released for general clinical use. Monitoring for further reactions continues, and from these data a drug's uses, contraindications, and limitations can be outlined. All of this work devolves primarily upon the pharmaceutical companies responsible for producing new drugs. Their efforts, nonetheless, are supervised and checked by official bodies, such as the Food and Drug Administration in the United States.

      The sale and supply of drugs unsafe for self-medication are limited to a doctor's order or prescription. Each country has its own laws regulating this arrangement. In addition, educational campaigns are promoted by pharmaceutical companies, professional associations, and medical journals in order to induce doctors to prescribe judiciously and discriminatingly and, further, to convince the public that the misuse of medicines can have tragic consequences. Despite all of this activity, however, probably more poisoning is due to medicines than to any other cause.

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Universalium. 2010.

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