Archytas of Tarentum

Archytas of Tarentum

▪ Greek mathematician
flourished 400–350 BC, Tarentum, Magna Graecia [now Taranto, Italy]

      Greek scientist, philosopher, and major Pythagorean mathematician. Plato, a close friend, made use of his work in mathematics, and there is evidence that Euclid borrowed from him for the treatment of number theory in Book VIII of his Elements. Archytas was also an influential figure in public affairs, and he served for seven years as commander in chief of his city.

      A member of the second generation of followers of Pythagoras, the Greek philosopher who stressed the significance of numbers in explaining all phenomena, Archytas sought to combine empirical observation with Pythagorean theory. In geometry, he solved the problem of doubling the cube by an ingenious construction in solid geometry using the intersection of a cone, a sphere, and a cylinder. (Earlier, Hippocrates of Chios showed that if a cube of side a is given and b and c are line segments such that a:b = b:c = c:2a, then a cube of side b has twice the volume, as required. Archytas's construction showed how, given a, to construct the segments b and c with the proper proportions.)

      Archytas also applied the theory of proportions to musical harmony. Thus, he showed that if n and n + 1 are any two consecutive whole numbers, then there is no rational number b such that n:b = b:(n + 1); he was thus able to define intervals of pitch in the enharmonic scale in addition to those already known in the chromatic (chromaticism) and diatonic scales. Rejecting earlier views that the pitch of notes sounded on a stringed instrument is related to the length or tension of the strings, he correctly showed instead that pitch is related to the movement of vibrating air. However, he incorrectly asserted that the speed at which the vibrations travel to the ear is a factor in determining pitch.

      Archytas's reputation as a scientist and mathematician rests on his achievements in geometry, acoustics, and music theory, rather than on his extremely idealistic explanations of human relations and the nature of society according to Pythagorean number theory. Nonmathematical writings usually attributed to him, including a fragment on legal justice, are most likely the work of other authors.

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Universalium. 2010.

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