Puzo, Mario

Puzo, Mario
▪ 2000

      American novelist and screenwriter (b. Oct. 15, 1920, New York, N.Y.—d. July 2, 1999, Bay Shore, N.Y.), chronicled a fictional Mafia family, the Corleones, in The Godfather (1969), which became one of the most successful novels ever—selling some 21 million copies worldwide, spawning three critically and financially successful motion pictures, and placing its characters into the contemporary American cultural mythology. Puzo grew up in New York City's Hell's Kitchen and dropped out of school to get a job after his father deserted the family. He became a railroad clerk but already was harbouring dreams of being a writer. After his military service in Germany during World War II, he returned to New York City and studied at the New School for Social Research and Columbia University. While working as a civil servant, Puzo began writing pulp stories for men's magazines. His first two novels, The Dark Arena (1955) and The Fortunate Pilgrim (1964), attracted good reviews but few buyers. It was then that Puzo decided to write something that would make enough money for him to support his family. Although he had no personal knowledge of organized crime, thorough research gave him the details he needed, and The Godfather, which depicted the family's strong bonds as well as its criminal activities, was a phenomenal success. Puzo collaborated with director Francis Ford Coppola on the screenplay of The Godfather (1972) and its two sequels (1974 and 1990). The first two won nine Academy Awards, including best picture and best screenplay Oscars for each. Puzo also contributed to the screenplays of such motion pictures as the first two Superman films (1978 and 1980) and The Cotton Club (1984). His other novels include Fools Die (1978), The Sicilian (1984; filmed, 1987), and The Last Don (1996; television miniseries, 1997). Puzo's last book, Omerta, was scheduled to be published in 2000; he considered it, along with The Godfather and The Last Don, part of his Mafia trilogy.

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Universalium. 2010.

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