King, Coretta Scott

King, Coretta Scott
▪ 2007
 American activist (b. April 27, 1927, Marion, Ala.—d. Jan. 30, 2006, Playa de Rosarito, Mex.), together with her husband, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., played a central role in the civil rights movement. Coretta Scott graduated from Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, and in 1951 enrolled at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. While working toward a degree in voice, she met King, then a graduate theology student at Boston University. They were married in 1953 and had four children. After both had completed their studies, the Kings moved to Montgomery, Ala., where Martin had accepted a position as pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Coretta joined her husband in civil rights activism through the 1950s and '60s, taking part in the Montgomery bus boycott (1955) and aiding in efforts to pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Following the assassination of her husband in 1968 and the conviction of James Earl Ray for the murder, she continued to be active in the civil rights movement. She founded in Atlanta the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, which was led at the turn of the 21st century by her son Dexter. The family's attempt to sell portions of King's papers brought her criticism in the late 1990s. She wrote a memoir, My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr. (1969), and edited, with Dexter, The Martin Luther King, Jr., Companion: Quotations from the Speeches, Essays, and Books of Martin Luther King, Jr. (1998). In 1969 she established an annual Coretta Scott King Award to honour an African American author of an outstanding text for children, and in 1979 she instituted a similar award to honour an outstanding African American illustrator. Following a stroke in August 2005, she began receiving rehabilitation therapy in Mexico.

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▪ American civil-rights activist
née  Coretta Scott 
born April 27, 1927, Marion, Alabama, U.S.
died January 31, 2006, Rosarito, Mexico

      American civil rights (civil rights movement) activist, who was the wife of Martin Luther King, Jr. (King, Martin Luther, Jr.)

      Coretta Scott graduated from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and in 1951 enrolled at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. While working toward a degree in voice, she met Martin Luther King, Jr., then a graduate theology student at Boston University. They were married in 1953 and had four children.

      After both had completed their studies, the Kings moved to Montgomery, Alabama, where Martin Luther King had accepted a position as pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Coretta Scott King joined her husband in civil rights activism in the 1950s and '60s, taking part in the Montgomery bus boycott (1955) and efforts to pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

      Following the assassination of her husband in 1968 and the conviction of James Earl Ray (Ray, James Earl) for the murder, she continued to be active in the civil rights movement. She founded in Atlanta, Georgia, the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center for Nonviolent Social Change (commonly known as the King Center), which was led at the turn of the 21st century by her son Dexter. The family's attempt to sell portions of King's papers brought her criticism in the late 1990s. She wrote a memoir, My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr. (1969), and edited, with her son Dexter, The Martin Luther King, Jr., Companion: Quotations from the Speeches, Essays, and Books of Martin Luther King, Jr. (1998). In 1969 she established an annual Coretta Scott King Award to honour an African American author of an outstanding text for children, and in 1979 a similar award was added to honour an outstanding African American illustrator.

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Universalium. 2010.

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