Tempyō style

Tempyō style
Japanese sculptural style of the Nara period (710–784), greatly influenced by the Chinese imperial style of the Tang dynasty (618–907).

Many supreme sculptural achievements of Japanese Buddhist art were created during this era, often in unbaked clay, solid wood, and lacquered cloth molded on a removable core (a technique called kanshitsu, or dry lacquer). Tempyō style shows a closer fusion of parts into a unified whole than is found in works of the Early Nara period, giving a sense of activity and realistic observation; the new realism is especially notable in portrait sculpture.

Ashura, dry lacquer (kanshitsu) sculpture in the Tempyō style, Late Nara period ...

Asuka-en, Japan

* * *

▪ Japanese art
 Japanese sculptural style of the Late Nara period (724–794), greatly influenced by the Chinese Imperial style of the T'ang dynasty (618–907). During this prolific era, many of the supreme sculptural achievements of Japanese Buddhist art were created in unbaked clay, solid wood, and especially lacquered cloth molded on a removable core or wooden armature (a technique called dry lacquer, or kanshitsu [q.v.]).

      The Tempyō style is characterized by a closer fusion of parts into a unified whole than is found in works of the Early Nara period. Forms flow into one another and drapery is integrated with the structure of the body in a more naturalistic way, giving a sense of activity and realistic observation. The lacquer and clay sculpture shows beautiful modelling of hands and face. Because the wooden armature used in sculpture executed in these techniques imposed a vertical balance and a certain rigidity of pose, the artist was driven to concentrate on facial expression. The new realism is especially notable in the development of portrait sculpture. The period was also notable for multiple-armed and many-headed images, literal iconographical portrayals of the esoteric Buddhist doctrines that were to gain popularity in the 9th century.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Поможем сделать НИР

Look at other dictionaries:

  • style — styleless, adj. stylelessness, n. stylelike, adj. /stuyl/, n., v. styled, styling. n. 1. a particular kind, sort, or type, as with reference to form, appearance, or character: the baroque style; The style of the house was too austere for their… …   Universalium

  • Estilo Tempyō — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda El estilo Tempyō fue un estilo escultórico japonés del período Nara, entre los años 710 y 784. Muy influenciado por el estilo imperial chino de la dinastía Tang, durante su apogeo se alcanzaron muchos de los… …   Wikipedia Español

  • East Asian arts — Visual, literary, and performing arts of China, Korea, and Japan. Painting and calligraphy are considered the only true fine arts in China because they alone require no physical labour and have no physical function. Sculpture is considered to be… …   Universalium

  • arts, East Asian — Introduction       music and visual and performing arts of China, Korea, and Japan. The literatures of these countries are covered in the articles Chinese literature, Korean literature, and Japanese literature.       Some studies of East Asia… …   Universalium

  • Shōsōin — The nihongo|Shōsōin|正倉院 is the treasure house that belongs to Tōdai ji, Naracite web|title=nihongo2|正倉院ホームページ (Shōsōin Homepage, Imperial Household Agency (Japan))|language=Japanese|url=http://shosoin.kunaicho.go.jp/|accessdate = 2007 03 12] [… …   Wikipedia

  • Hiragushi Denchū — ▪ Japanese sculptor also called  Takutarō  born Feb. 23, 1872, Okayama prefecture, Japan died Dec. 30, 1979, Tokyo       sculptor who worked to preserve traditional Japanese wood carving methods.       Hiragushi set out for Ōsaka at the age of 21 …   Universalium

  • Yakushi-ji — nihongo|Yakushi ji|薬師寺 is one of the most famous imperial and ancient Buddhist temples in Japan, located in Nara. The temple is the headquarters of the Hossō school of Japanese Buddhism. Yakushi ji is one of the sites that are collectively… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”