whoop

whoop
/hoohp, hoop/; esp. for 1, 3-5, 7-12 /hwoohp, hwoop, woohp, woop/, n.
1. a loud cry or shout, as of excitement or joy.
2. the sound made by a person suffering from whooping cough.
3. not worth a whoop, Informal. to be worthless: Their promises aren't worth a whoop.
v.i.
4. to utter a loud cry or shout in expressing enthusiasm, excitement, etc.
5. to cry as an owl, crane, or certain other birds.
6. to make the characteristic sound accompanying the deep intake of air following a series of coughs in whooping cough.
v.t.
7. to utter with or as if with a whoop.
8. to whoop to or at.
9. to call, urge, pursue, or drive with whoops: to whoop dogs on.
10. whoop it up, Informal.
a. to raise a disturbance, as to celebrate noisily: They whooped it up after winning the big game.
b. to stir up enthusiasm, as for an idea or project: Every spring they whoop it up for the circus.
11. whoop up, Informal. to promote or praise; extol: a class reunion where they whoop up the good old days.
12. (used as a cry to attract attention from afar, or to show excitement, encouragement, enthusiasm, etc.)
[1350-1400; ME whopen, OE hwopan to threaten; c. Goth hwopan to boast]

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • whoop — [hwo͞op, wo͞op, ho͞op] n. [ME houpen, to call, shout, echoic (or < ? OFr houper, to call afar off, cry out)] a loud shout, cry, or noise; specif., a) a shrill and prolonged cry, as of excitement, exultation, ferocity, etc. b) a hoot, as of an… …   English World dictionary

  • Whoop — Whoop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Whooped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Whooping}.] [OE. houpen. See {Hoop}, v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. To utter a whoop, or loud cry, as eagerness, enthusiasm, or enjoyment; to cry out; to shout; to halloo; to utter a war whoop; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whoop — whoop; whoop·er; whoop·la; whoop·ee; …   English syllables

  • whoop — ► NOUN 1) a loud cry of joy or excitement. 2) a long rasping indrawn breath. ► VERB ▪ give or make a whoop. ● whoop it up Cf. ↑whoop it up ORIGIN probably imitative …   English terms dictionary

  • Whoop — Whoop, n. 1. A shout of pursuit or of war; a very of eagerness, enthusiasm, enjoyment, vengeance, terror, or the like; an halloo; a hoot, or cry, as of an owl. [1913 Webster] A fox, crossing the road, drew off a considerable detachment, who… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whoop-de-do — [ˌwu:p di: ˈdu:, ˌhu:p ] interjection AmE spoken [Date: 1900 2000; Origin: Perhaps from whoop + to do] used to show that you do not think something that someone has told you is as exciting or impressive as they think it is ▪ He says he ll give me …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • whoop — [wu:p, hu:p] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: houpper, from the sound.] 1.) to shout loudly and happily ▪ Hundreds of people ran past them, whooping joyously. 2.) whoop it up [i]informal to enjoy yourself very much, especially in a large …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • whoop — (v.) mid 14c., houpen, partly imitative, partly from O.Fr. houper to cry out, also imitative. It is attested as an interjection from at least mid 15c. The noun is recorded from c.1600. Extended form whoopee is attested from 1845, originally… …   Etymology dictionary

  • whoop-de-do — ☆ whoop de do or whoop de doo [hwo͞opdē do͞o′, wo͞opdē do͞o′ho͞opdē do͞o′ ] n. [extended < WHOOP] Informal noisy or excited activity, commotion, or fuss; hoopla, ballyhoo, to do, etc …   English World dictionary

  • whoop it up — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To make a loud noise; have a noisy celebration; enjoy yourself noisily. * /The team whooped it up after winning the game./ 2. To praise something enthusiastically; encourage enthusiasm or support. Often used with for . *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • whoop it up — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To make a loud noise; have a noisy celebration; enjoy yourself noisily. * /The team whooped it up after winning the game./ 2. To praise something enthusiastically; encourage enthusiasm or support. Often used with for . *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

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