snook

snook
snook1
/snoohk, snook/, n., pl. (esp. collectively) snook, (esp. referring to two or more kinds or species) snooks.
1. any basslike fish of the genus Centropomus, esp. C. undecimalis, inhabiting waters off Florida and the West Indies and south to Brazil, valued as food and game.
2. any of several related marine fishes.
[1690-1700; < D snoek]
snook2
/snook, snoohk/, n.
1. a gesture of defiance, disrespect, or derision.
2. cock a snook or cock one's snook, to thumb the nose: a painter who cocks a snook at traditional techniques.
Also, cock a snoot.
[1875-80; orig. uncert.]

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Any of about eight species (genus Centropomus) of tropical marine fishes that are long and silvery and have two dorsal fins, a long head, and a large mouth with a projecting lower jaw.

They are found along the North and South American Atlantic and Pacific coasts, often in estuaries and among mangroves and sometimes in fresh water. They range from 1.5 to 5 ft (0.5–1.5 m) long and are valued for food and sport.

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fish
also called  robalo 

      any of about eight species of marine fishes constituting the genus Centropomus and the family Centropomidae (order Perciformes). Snooks are long, silvery, pikelike fishes with two dorsal fins, a long head, and a rather large mouth with a projecting lower jaw. Tropical fishes, they are found along the American Atlantic and Pacific coasts, often in estuaries and among mangroves and, sometimes, in fresh water. They range from 0.5 to 1.5 m (1.5 to 5 feet) long and are valued for food and sport.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Snook — or Snoek may refer to:* Fish in the family ** Centropomidae especially the common snook. ** Gempylidae (Snake Mackerels) ** Percidae (Perches) ** Scombridae (Mackerels, tunas, bonitos), subfamily: Scombrinae ** Sphyraenidae (Barracudas) **… …   Wikipedia

  • snook — snook1 [snook] n. pl. snook or snooks [Du snoek, pike < MDu snoec, akin to ON snokr, small shark & OE snacc, small vessel] any of a family (Centropomidae) of percoid fishes of warm seas; esp., a large game and food fish (Centropomus… …   English World dictionary

  • Snook — (sn[=oo]k), v. i. [Prov. E. snook to search out, to follow by the scent; cf. Sw. snoka to lurk, LG. sn[ o]ggen, snuckern, sn[ o]kern, to snuffle, to smell about, to search for.] To lurk; to lie in ambush. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Snook — Snook, TX U.S. city in Texas Population (2000): 568 Housing Units (2000): 252 Land area (2000): 2.010121 sq. miles (5.206189 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.003327 sq. miles (0.008617 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.013448 sq. miles (5.214806 sq. km)… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Snook, TX — U.S. city in Texas Population (2000): 568 Housing Units (2000): 252 Land area (2000): 2.010121 sq. miles (5.206189 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.003327 sq. miles (0.008617 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.013448 sq. miles (5.214806 sq. km) FIPS code:… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Snook — Snook, n. [D. snoek.] (Zo[ o]l.) (a) A large perchlike marine food fish ({Centropomus undecimalis}) found both on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of tropical America; called also {ravallia}, and {robalo}. (b) The cobia. (c) The garfish. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • snook — [snu:k US snuk, snu:k] n →cock a snook at ↑cock2 (5) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • snook — [ snuk, snuk ] noun BRITISH MAINLY JOURNALISM cock a snook at to deliberately do something that insults someone or shows a lack of respect for someone or something …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • snook — snook; snook·er; …   English syllables

  • snook — ► NOUN (in phrase cock a snook) informal, chiefly Brit. 1) place one s hand so that the thumb touches one s nose and the fingers are spread out, as a gesture of contempt. 2) openly show contempt or a lack of respect for someone or something.… …   English terms dictionary

  • snook — “derisive gesture,” 1791, of unknown origin …   Etymology dictionary

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