Santería

Santería
/sahn'teuh ree"euh/, n.
(sometimes l.c.) a religion merging the worship of Yoruba deities with veneration of Roman Catholic saints: practiced in Cuba and spread to other parts of the Caribbean and to the U.S. by Cuban emigrés.
Also, Santeria.
[1980-85; < AmerSp, = santer(o) person practicing Santería (Sp sant(o) SAINT + -ero < L -arius -ARY) + -ía -IA]

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Religious movement that originated in Cuba.

It combines West African Yoruba beliefs and practices with elements of Roman Catholicism. It includes belief in one supreme being, but worship and rituals centre on orishas, deities or patron saints (with parallels among the Roman Catholic saints) that combine a force of nature and humanlike characteristics. Practices may include trance dancing, rhythmic drumming, spirit possession, and animal sacrifice. Santería has a considerable following in the U.S., particularly in Florida and in other areas with large African and Hispanic populations. See also Candomblé; Macumba; Vodou.

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Spanish“The Way of the Saints”, also called  La Regla de Ocha (Spanish: “The Order of the Orishas”)  or  La Religión Lucumí (Spanish: “The Order of Lucumí”) 

      the most common name given to a religious tradition of African origin that was developed in Cuba and then spread throughout Latin America and the United States.

      Santería was brought to Cuba by the people of the Yoruban (Yoruba) nations of West Africa, who were enslaved in great numbers in the first decades of the 19th century. The name “Santería” derives from the correspondences made by some devotees between the Yoruba deities called orishas and the saints (santos) of Roman Catholic (Roman Catholicism) piety. Many contemporary practitioners refer to the tradition as “the religion of the orishas” or the “Lukumi religion,” after the name by which the Yoruba were known in Cuba.

      Santería is based upon the development of personal relationships through divination, sacrifice, initiation, and mediumship (see medium) between practitioners of the religion and the orisha deities, who provide their devotees with protection, wisdom, and success and who guide devotees in times of crisis. It is believed that access to the orishas can be achieved through various types of divination. In the Ifá oracle, for example, a trained priest, a babalawo (“father of the mystery”), interprets the fall of consecrated palm nuts to reveal the orishas' response to a seeker's question. Most Ifá consultations prescribe some form of sacrifice to one or several of the orishas. These offerings may range from simple presentations before home altars to elaborate feasts in the orishas' honour. As a result of these ceremonial exchanges, the oracle often determines that one particular orisha has claimed the devotee as its child. Preparations are then made for the grand and irrevocable initiation of the devotee into that orisha's mysteries. In the crowning ceremony, the symbols of the patron orisha are placed on the head of the devotee, and he or she may enter a ceremonial trance and become a medium for that orisha. At drum dances called bembés, initiated devotees, now properly called olorishas—those who “have the orisha”—may lose their ordinary consciousness and manifest that of their orisha patrons. Through the bodies of their mediums the orishas are believed to interact with the congregation directly and heal and prophesy for those who approach them.

      From the Cuban Revolution of 1959 to the early 21st century, nearly one million Cubans left the island, bringing Orisha religion to cities throughout the Americas, particularly Miami and New York. The tradition also spread to other Latino communities, African Americans, and white Americans. Although census data are lacking, it is likely that initiated devotees number in the tens of thousands and that those who consult an orisha at one time or another may be counted in the millions.

      Devotees see the Orisha tradition as a world religion and have received public recognition of their spiritual achievements. In 1993 the U.S. Supreme Court (Supreme Court of the United States) unanimously upheld the right of devotees to practice the controversial rite of animal sacrifice (sacrifice) in the case Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. Hialeah. The U.S. Army and Federal Bureau of Prisons have incorporated orisha ministries into their chaplaincies. Musicians, painters, sculptors, and writers have found in the Orisha tradition sources of African artistry and pride. It is likely that Orisha traditions will continue to grow and be recognized as one of the principal African contributions to world culture.

Joseph M. Murphy

Additional Reading
Useful introductions to the history and practices of the tradition are George Brandon, Santeria from Africa to the New World: The Dead Sell Memories (1993); Joseph M. Murphy, Santería: An African Religion in America (1988, reissued 1993); and Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit: African and Afro-American Art and Philosophy (1983).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • santería — sustantivo femenino 1. (no contable) Área: religión Pragmática: peyorativo. Devoción exagerada o falsa. Sinónimo: beatería. 2. (no contable) Forma de religión practicada por personas que creen tener contactos con diferentes tipos de e …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • Santeria — or Santería [sän΄tə rē′ə] n. a religion of the Caribbean region that originated in Cuba, based on Yoruban deities worshiped as Roman Catholic saints in rites that sometimes include the sacrifice of animals …   English World dictionary

  • santeria — Afro Cuban religion, 1950, from Sp., lit. holiness, sanctity …   Etymology dictionary

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  • Santería — For the Sublime song, see Santeria (song). Santería is a syncretic religion of West African and Caribbean origin influenced by Roman Catholic Christianity, also known as Regla de Ocha, La Regla Lucumi, or Lukumi.[1][2] Its liturgical language, a… …   Wikipedia

  • Santeria — Eleggua, divinité (Orisha) du destin La Santería (Lukumi, La Regla Lucumi ou regla de Ocha) est une religion originaire des Caraïbes dérivée du Yoruba (interdit aux esclaves) et pratiquée à Cuba, en Colombie et au Venezuela …   Wikipédia en Français

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