reproach

reproach
reproachable, adj.reproachableness, n.reproachably, adv.reproacher, n.reproachingly, adv.
/ri prohch"/, v.t.
1. to find fault with (a person, group, etc.); blame; censure.
2. to upbraid.
3. to be a cause of blame or discredit to.
n.
4. blame or censure conveyed in disapproval: a term of reproach.
5. an expression of upbraiding, censure, or reproof.
6. disgrace, discredit, or blame incurred: to bring reproach on one's family.
7. a cause or occasion of disgrace or discredit.
8. the Reproaches. Also called Improperia. Rom. Cath. Ch., Anglican Ch. a series of antiphons sung in church on Good Friday, consisting of words addressed by Christ to His people, reminding them of His mercies and of their ingratitude.
9. an object of scorn or contempt.
[1375-1425; (n.) late ME reproche < OF, deriv. of reprochier to reproach < VL *repropiare to bring back near, equiv. to L re- RE- + LL -propiare (deriv. of L prope near; see APPROACH); (v.) late ME reprochen < OF reprochier]
Syn. 1. chide, abuse, reprimand, reprehend, condemn, criticize. REPROACH, REBUKE, SCOLD, REPROVE imply calling one to account for something done or said. REPROACH is censure (often about personal matters, obligations, and the like) given with an attitude of faultfinding and some intention of shaming: to reproach one for neglect. REBUKE suggests sharp or stern reproof given usually formally or officially and approaching reprimand in severity: He rebuked him strongly for laxness in his accounts.
SCOLD suggests that censure is given at some length, harshly, and more or less abusively; it implies irritation, which may be with or without justification: to scold a boy for jaywalking. A word of related meaning, but suggesting a milder or more kindly censure, often intended to correct the fault in question, is REPROVE: to reprove one for inattention. 3. shame. 4, 5. reprehension, rebuke, criticism, remonstrance, condemnation, disapproval. 6. dishonor, shame, disrepute, odium, obloquy, opprobrium, ignominy, infamy, scorn.
Ant. 1, 4, 5. praise. 6. honor.

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  • Reproach — Re*proach , n. [F. reproche. See {Reproach}, v.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of reproaching; censure mingled with contempt; contumelious or opprobrious language toward any person; abusive reflections; as, severe reproach. [1913 Webster] No… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reproach — ► VERB 1) express one s disapproval of or disappointment with. 2) (reproach with) accuse of. ► NOUN ▪ an expression of disapproval or disappointment. ● above (or beyond) reproach Cf. ↑beyond reproach …   English terms dictionary

  • Reproach — Re*proach (r? pr?ch ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} ( pr?cht ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near to, throw …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reproach — [n] strong criticism; dishonor abuse, admonishment, admonition, blame, blemish, censure, chiding, condemnation, contempt, disapproval, discredit, disgrace, disrepute, ignominy, indignity, obloquy, odium, opprobrium, rap*, rebuke, reprehension,… …   New thesaurus

  • reproach — I noun accusation, animadversion, blame, castigation, censure, chastisement, chiding, complaint, condemnation, contempt, contumelia, contumely, correction, degradation, denouncement, denunciation, derogation, disapprobation, disapproval,… …   Law dictionary

  • reproach — vb chide, admonish, *reprove, rebuke, reprimand Analogous words: *criticize, reprehend, censure, reprobate: *warn, forewarn, caution: counsel, advise (see under ADVICE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reproach — [ri prōch′] vt. [LME reprochen < OFr reprochier < VL * repropiare < L re , back + prope, near] 1. to accuse of and blame for a fault so as to make feel ashamed; rebuke; reprove 2. Rare to bring shame and disgrace upon; be a cause of… …   English World dictionary

  • reproach — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bitter ▪ mild ▪ There was mild reproach in his tone. PREPOSITION ▪ above reproach, beyond …   Collocations dictionary

  • reproach — re|proach1 [rıˈprəutʃ US ˈproutʃ] n formal [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: reproche, from reprochier to reproach , from Vulgar Latin repropiare, from Latin prope near ] 1.) [U] criticism, blame, or disapproval ▪ You don t need me, she… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • reproach — I UK [rɪˈprəʊtʃ] / US [rɪˈproʊtʃ] verb [transitive] Word forms reproach : present tense I/you/we/they reproach he/she/it reproaches present participle reproaching past tense reproached past participle reproached to criticize someone and feel… …   English dictionary

  • reproach — [[t]rɪpro͟ʊtʃ[/t]] reproaches, reproaching, reproached 1) VERB If you reproach someone, you say or show that you are disappointed, upset, or angry because they have done something wrong. [V n] She is quick to reproach anyone who doesn t live up… …   English dictionary

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