prerogative court

prerogative court
1. a former ecclesiastical court in England and Ireland for the trial of certain testamentary cases.
2. (formerly) the court of probate in New Jersey.
[1595-1605]

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In English law, a court through which the powers, privileges, and immunities reserved to the sovereign were exercised.

Such courts were originally formed during the period when the sovereign's power was greater than the Parliament's. The Star Chamber, the High Commission, and the Court of Chancery all achieved importance in the 16th century. By the 17th century they were being challenged by the common law courts and competing political interests, and they were soon put out of business. See also Privy Council.

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▪ English law
      in English law, court through which the discretionary powers, privileges, and legal immunities reserved to the sovereign were exercised. Prerogative courts were originally formed during the period when the monarch exercised greater power than Parliament.

      The royal prerogative is essentially the legitimate exercise of the sovereign's authority. Various powers have been considered part of it, including the coining of money, the creating of peers (members of the House of Lords (Lords, House of)), the calling and dissolving of Parliament, and the governing of the Church of England (England, Church of), all of which are formally—though not substantively—prerogatives still retained by the British sovereign. Formerly prerogatives, the powers to legislate, tax, and deal with emergency situations have long belonged to Parliament.

      By the time of the Reformation in the 16th century, the crown's prerogative powers had grown considerably. Certain courts had developed out of the king's council (Curia Regis) to give, in effect, the king's relief in those cases in which the common-law (common law) courts had failed to provide adequate remedy or in those areas in which they did not deal. Those courts, all of which played an important role in carrying out royal authority, became permanent specialized institutions, such as the Court of Star Chamber (Star Chamber, Court of), which dealt with offenses against public order; the Court of High Commission (High Commission, Court of), which was established to enforce the Reformation settlement; the Court of Requests (Requests, Court of), a poor-man's court that handled small-claims cases; and the Court of Chancery (Chancery, Court of), which was essentially a court of equity.

      By the early 17th century, the prerogative courts had provoked considerable opposition from the common-law courts, which had lost a good deal of business to them and saw any further extension of their jurisdiction as a threat to the survival of common law. This opposition reached its zenith at the time when the parliamentary forces were enraged at the determination of Charles I (reigned 1625–49) to govern without Parliament and at his use of the prerogative courts (particularly the Star Chamber and the High Commission) to enforce his religious and social policies. Consequently, with the exception of the Chancery, which had developed important procedures in the areas of trust with which the common-law courts refused to deal, most prerogative courts were either abolished by the Long Parliament or ceased to exist after the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660. The sole prerogative court to survive the Restoration in some form was the Court of Requests, which was itself abolished by the end of the 17th century.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Prerogative Court — Prerogative Pre*rog a*tive, n. [F. pr[ e]rogative, from L. praerogativa precedence in voting, preference, privilege, fr. praerogativus that is asked before others for his opinion, that votes before or first, fr. praerogare to ask before another;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Prerogative court — A prerogative court was one of the English provincial courts of Canterbury and York that had jurisdiction over the estates of deceased persons.They had jurisdiction to grant probate or administration where the diocesan courts could not entertain… …   Wikipedia

  • prerogative court — noun 1. : an ecclesiastical court formerly exercising probate jurisdiction with respect to wills and estates of decedents 2. : a court formerly appointed by the royal governor of an American colony 3. : orphans court …   Useful english dictionary

  • prerogative court — A probate court. Robinson v Fair, 128 US 53, 86, 32 L Ed 415, 423 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Prerogative Court —    See Dean s Court3, Carter Lane …   Dictionary of London

  • Prerogative — Pre*rog a*tive, n. [F. pr[ e]rogative, from L. praerogativa precedence in voting, preference, privilege, fr. praerogativus that is asked before others for his opinion, that votes before or first, fr. praerogare to ask before another; prae before… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Prerogative office — Prerogative Pre*rog a*tive, n. [F. pr[ e]rogative, from L. praerogativa precedence in voting, preference, privilege, fr. praerogativus that is asked before others for his opinion, that votes before or first, fr. praerogare to ask before another;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prerogative — /prsrogatav/ An exclusive or peculiar right or privilege. The special power, privilege, immunity, right or advantage vested in an official person, either generally, or in respect to the things of his office, or in an official body, as a court or… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Prerogative — A Prerogative is an exclusive legal right given from a government or state and invested in an individual or group, the content of which is separate from the body of rights enjoyed under the general law of the normative state. It was a common… …   Wikipedia

  • Prerogative Office —    Now in Somerset House.    In O. and M. at the south end of Prerogative Court leading out of St. Paul s Church yard, 1677.    Afterwards removed to Great Knightrider Street, adjoining Doctors Commons (Rocque, 1746). Remained there until 1874,… …   Dictionary of London

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