norm

norm
normless, adj.
/nawrm/, n.
1. a standard, model, or pattern.
2. general level or average: Two cars per family is the norm in most suburban communities.
3. Educ.
a. a designated standard of average performance of people of a given age, background, etc.
b. a standard based on the past average performance of a given individual.
4. Math.
a. a real-valued, nonnegative function whose domain is a vector space, with properties such that the function of a vector is zero only when the vector is zero, the function of a scalar times a vector is equal to the absolute value of the scalar times the function of the vector, and the function of the sum of two vectors is less than or equal to the sum of the functional values of each vector. The norm of a real number is its absolute value.
b. the greatest difference between two successive points of a given partition.
[1815-25; < L norma carpenter's square, rule, pattern]

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also called  Social Norm,  

      rule or standard of behaviour shared by members of a social group. Norms may be internalized—i.e., incorporated within the individual so that there is conformity without external rewards or punishments, or they may be enforced by positive or negative sanctions from without. The social unit sharing particular norms may be small (e.g., a clique of friends) or may include all adult members of a society. Norms are more specific than values or ideals: honesty is a general value, but the rules defining what is honest behaviour in a particular situation are norms.

      There are two schools of thought regarding why people conform to norms. The functionalist school of sociology maintains that norms reflect a consensus, a common value system developed through socialization, the process by which an individual learns the culture of his group. Norms contribute to the functioning of the social system and are said to develop to meet certain assumed “needs” of the system. The conflict school holds that norms are a mechanism for dealing with recurring social problems. The Marxian variety of conflict theory states that norms reflect the power of one section of a society over the other sections and that coercion and sanctions maintain these rules. Norms are thought to originate as a means by which one class or caste dominates or exploits others. Neither school adequately explains differences between and within societies.

      Norm is also used to mean a statistically determined standard or the average behaviour, attitude, or opinion of a social group. In this sense it means actual, rather than expected, behaviour.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • norm — [ nɔrm ] noun ** 1. ) count something that is usual or expected: Computer generated images will become an accepted norm in movies. the norm: These children live in communities where failure is the norm. Fast cars have become the norm. 2. ) count… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • norm — I noun average, general performance, generality, habit, median, midpoint, model, mold, ordinary run, pattern, point of comparison, regular performance, rule, standard, typical performance II index code, criterion, cross section, example …   Law dictionary

  • Norm — Sf std. (14. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus l. nōrma Richtschnur, Regel (zunächst ein Geräte zum Messen rechter Winkel), das unklarer Herkunft ist. Adjektive: normal, normativ; Verben: normen, normieren.    Ebenso nndl. norm, ne. norm, nfrz. norme …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • norm — norm, social norm, normative In sociology a norm is a shared expectation of behaviour that connotes what is considered culturally desirable and appropriate. Norms are similar to rules or regulations in being prescriptive, although they lack the… …   Dictionary of sociology

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