Lebanon Mountains

Lebanon Mountains
a mountain range extending the length of Lebanon, in the central part. Highest peak, 10,049 ft. (3063 m).

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Arabic Jabal Lubnān ancient Libanus

Mountain range, Lebanon.

Running parallel to the Mediterranean Sea coast, it is about 100 mi (160 km) long. The northern section is the highest part of the range and includes the loftiest peak, Qurnat al-Sawdāʾ , at 10,131 ft (8,088 m) in elevation. On its western slopes are the remaining groves of the famous cedars of Lebanon. The snowy peaks may have given Lebanon its name in antiquity; laban is Aramaic for "white."

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Arabic  Jabal Lubnān,  French  Mont Liban,  also called  Jabal Al-gharbī, or Mt. Lebanon,  

      mountain range, extending almost the entire length of Lebanon, paralleling the Mediterranean coast for about 150 mi (240 km), with northern outliers extending into Syria.

      The northern section, north of the saddle, or pass, of Ḍahr al-Baydar (through which the Beirut–Damascus railroad and highway run), is the widest and loftiest part of the mountains, which average 7,000 ft (2,100 m) above sea level, with a few snowcapped peaks, including Qurnat as-Sawdāʾ, at 10,131 ft. On the western flanks, east of Bsharrī, are the remaining groves of the renowned Cedars of Lebanon. South of the pass the mountains average 5,000–6,000 ft in altitude. In southern Lebanon they are broken by the 900-ft-deep gorge of the Nahr (river) al-Līṭānī. Although the porous limestone of the mountains forms poor, thin soil, it has helped create numerous underground springs that make irrigated cultivation of the lower and middle slopes possible. A variety of tree crops (including olives, apricots, and apples) are grown on the coastal side. The view presented by the snow-clad peaks may have given Lebanon its name in antiquity; laban is Aramaic for “white.”

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lebanon Mountains — or ancient Libanus geographical name mountains Lebanon running parallel to coast W of Bekaa Valley …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Lebanon Mountains — Leb′anon Moun′tains n. pl. geg a mountain range extending the length of Lebanon, in the central part. Highest peak, 10,049 ft. (3063 m) …   From formal English to slang

  • Lebanon Mountains — /lɛbənɒn ˈmaʊntənz/ (say lebuhnon mowntuhnz) plural noun a mountain range extending the length of Lebanon, in the central part. Highest peak, 3063 m. Arabic, Lubnān Jabal …   Australian-English dictionary

  • Lebanon Mountains — a mountain range extending the length of Lebanon, in the central part. Highest peak, 10,049 ft. (3063 m) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Anti-Lebanon Mountains — Mountain range along the border of Syria and Lebanon. Running parallel to the Lebanon Mountains, the range averages 6,500 ft (2,000 m) in elevation. Because of its poor soil and steep slopes, it is sparsely populated. * * * ▪ mountains, Asia… …   Universalium

  • Anti-Lebanon mountains — The Anti Lebanon mountains, is the Western name for the Eastern Lebanon Mountain Range (Arabic: جبال لبنان الشرقية),which are a northeast trending mountain range between Syria and Lebanon. Its Western name (Anti Lebanon) comes from the Greek word …   Wikipedia

  • Anti-Lebanon Mountains — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Lebanon — [leb′ə nän΄, leb′ənən] 1. country in SW Asia, at the E end of the Mediterranean: formerly a French mandate, it became independent after elections (1944): 4,036 sq mi (10,453 sq km); pop. 2,760,000; cap. Beirut 2. mountain range extending nearly… …   English World dictionary

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