Grand Rapids

Grand Rapids
1. a city in SW Michigan: furniture factories. 181,843.
2. noting or pertaining to mass-produced furniture of generally low quality.

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City (pop., 2000: 197,800), western Michigan, U.S. Located on the Grand River, it was founded in 1826 as a trading post.

Ample lumber from nearby forests soon fueled a woodworking industry. After Grand Rapids furniture was shown at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, the city became known as the furniture capital of America. Its industry diversified with the advent of World War I, and metal-based manufacturing thereafter exceeded furniture. Its public library contains important collections of books on furniture design; its educational institutions include Kendall College of Art and Design (1928). It was the boyhood home of Pres. Gerald Ford.

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      city, seat (1836) of Kent county, western Michigan, U.S. It is situated along the Grand River, 25 miles (40 km) east of Lake Michigan (Michigan, Lake) and about 30 miles (50 km) southeast of Muskegon. It was founded in 1826 by Frenchman Louis Campau as a trading post where several important Ottawa Indian trails (which are now diagonal streets) converged at the rapids on the Grand River. Ample waterpower generated by the 18-foot (5.5-metre) fall of the river and the availability of valuable lumber from nearby pine and hardwood forests resulted in the establishment of a number of sawmills and woodworking (especially furniture-making (furniture industry)) industries in the town.

      Following the display of Grand Rapids furniture at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, the city gained a reputation as the furniture capital of America. Buyers the world over went to its furniture markets, first held in 1878. The diversification of its industry began with the advent of World War I, and metal-based manufacturing industries thereafter exceeded furniture in value and output. Nevertheless, Grand Rapids furniture produced by skilled craftsmen has maintained its eminence in quality, style, and design. Grand Rapids has become the state's second largest city and is the principal trading centre of western Michigan, including a large area devoted to fruit farming and truck gardening.

      The city's Public Museum (a complex founded in 1854 as a gift of the lumber baron T. Stewart White) includes historical and contemporary furniture exhibits as well as a planetarium, a botanical garden, and a Victorian-style house museum. The Grand Rapids Art Museum features local and regional artists. Several large sculptures are city landmarks, including La Grande Vitesse (1969), a monumental work by Alexander Calder (Calder, Alexander), and the bronze American Horse, by American sculptor Nina Akamu, based on plans by Leonardo da Vinci. The Heritage Hill Historic District includes hundreds of historic residences, including the Meyer May House (1908), designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (Wright, Frank Lloyd), and the Voigt House (1895). The city's public library contains one of the country's most important collections of books on furniture design and manufacture.

      Educational institutions include Davenport University (1866), Calvin College (1876), Aquinas College (1886), Grand Rapids Community College (1914), and Kendall College of Art and Design (1928). Grand Valley State University (1960) is centred in nearby Allendale, and six of the university's professional colleges—those of business, community and public services, education, engineering and computing, health professions, and nursing—are located in Grand Rapids proper. The city has some 30 parks, including a zoo.

      Grand Rapids was the boyhood home of U.S. Pres. Gerald R. Ford (Ford, Gerald R.), who represented (1948–73) the congressional district that included the city. The Gerald R. Ford Museum (paired with the Gerald R. Ford Library in Ann Arbor), part of the federal presidential library system, is located in the city. Inc. village, 1838; city, 1850. Pop. (2000) city, 197,800; Grand Rapids–Wyoming MSA, 740,482; (2005 est.) city, 193,780; Grand Rapids–Wyoming MSA, 771,185.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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