family practice

family practice
medical specialization in general practice, requiring training beyond that of general practice and leading to board certification.

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or family medicine or general practice

Field of medicine that stresses comprehensive primary health care, emphasizing the family unit.

Practitioners must be familiar to some degree with medical specialties and, especially in health maintenance organizations, are now often gatekeepers who refer patients to specialists when necessary. Once virtually the only kind of medicine, family practice has been defined as a separate field only since increasing specialization in medicine led to a shortage of practitioners. A 1963 World Health Organization report stressing the need for medical education to focus on the patient as a whole throughout life led to specific programs in family practice.

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also called  Family Medicine, or General Practice, 

      field of medicine that stresses comprehensive primary health care, regardless of the age or sex of the patient, with special emphasis on the family unit.

      Family practice as it is presently defined has only been officially recognized since 1969, but it developed from older models of general medical practice in which all of a patient's health care needs were met by a single physician. At the beginning of the 20th century, almost all physicians in the world were general practitioners, but the increasing volume of medical knowledge and reforms in medical education—such as those triggered in the United States by the Flexner Report of 1910—gave impetus to growing specialization in medical practice. Whereas more than 80 percent of American physicians were in general practice at the turn of the century, fewer than 20 percent had general practices by the mid-1970s; a similar shift to more specialized practice occurred in other developed countries, though usually to a lesser extent. Such countries as Great Britain reinforced the traditional ideas of general medical practice by making the general practitioner the entry point to the health care system; however, even in these countries, medical education and social status tended to favour specialists over generalists. Few training programs were designed to meet the needs of the family practitioner.

      By the 1960s, worldwide concern had developed over the shortage of general practitioners, and several major reports by governmental bodies and medical planners emphasized the need for more family physicians to serve as the first contact with the health care system and to provide continuous care of patients. A World Health Organization (WHO) report in 1963 stressed the need for medical education that focused on the patient as a whole throughout life, rather than on specific organ systems, disease entities, or age groups. These studies led to the development of residency training programs that are specifically designed to prepare individuals for general, or family, practice. As a specialty, family practice incorporates portions of other medical specialties, including internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, surgery, and psychiatry; the family physician must undergo a series of comprehensive tests of medical skill and knowledge to demonstrate his familiarity with the rapidly changing body of medical knowledge in these areas. Recertification is required every six years.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • family practice — n a medical practice or specialty which provides continuing general medical care for the individual and family abbr. FP called also family medicine * * * the medical specialty concerned with the planning and provision of the comprehensive primary …   Medical dictionary

  • family practice — n [U] a part of medical practice in the US in which doctors learn to treat general health problems of people of all ages …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • family practice — noun uncount the work of a doctor who deals with general health problems, especially those relating to families ╾ ,family prac titioner noun count …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • family practice — noun medical practice that provides health care regardless of age or sex while placing emphasis on the family unit • Syn: ↑family medicine • Hypernyms: ↑medical practice * * * noun : a medical practice or specialty which provides continuing… …   Useful english dictionary

  • family practice — UK / US noun [uncountable] Word forms family practice : singular family practice plural family practices the work of a doctor who deals with general health problems, especially those relating to families Derived word: family practitioner noun… …   English dictionary

  • family practice — noun Date: 1969 a medical practice or specialty which provides continuing general medical care for the individual and family called also family medicine …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • family practice — noun (U) AmE a part of medical practice in the US in which doctors learn to treat general health problems and problems connected with families and people of all ages family practitioner / ... . .../ noun (C) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • family practice — branch of medicine which provides general medical care for the whole family, family medicine …   English contemporary dictionary

  • family practice — fam′ily prac′tice n. med medical specialization in general practice that requires additional training and leads to board certification. Also called fam′ily med′icine fam′ily practi′tioner, n …   From formal English to slang

  • Family Practice Notebook — The Family Practice Notebook is a medical database focused on family practice.It is maintained by Scott Moses, MD, a physician from Minnesota.External links* [http://www.fpnotebook.com/index.htm Home] * [http://www.fpnotebook.com/about.htm… …   Wikipedia

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