escapement error

escapement error
Horol.
loss of isochronism in the movement of a pendulum as a result of its relation to the escapement.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Нужен реферат?

Look at other dictionaries:

  • escapement error — Horol. loss of isochronism in the movement of a pendulum as a result of its relation to the escapement …   Useful english dictionary

  • Escapement — redirects here. For the fisheries term for the stock surviving fishing pressures over a spawning cycle, see Spawn (biology). For other uses, see Escapement (disambiguation). A deadbeat escapement, used in many pendulum clocks. Click above to see… …   Wikipedia

  • Verge escapement — showing (c) crown wheel, (v) verge, (p,q) pallets Ve …   Wikipedia

  • Anchor escapement — Anchor escapement. The anchor and escape wheel of a late 19th century clock …   Wikipedia

  • Pendulum — This article is about pendulums. For other uses, see Pendulum (disambiguation). Simple gravity pendulum model assumes no friction or air resistance …   Wikipedia

  • clock — clock1 /klok/, n. 1. an instrument for measuring and recording time, esp. by mechanical means, usually with hands or changing numbers to indicate the hour and minute: not designed to be worn or carried about. 2. See time clock. 3. a meter or… …   Universalium

  • Balance wheel — in a cheap 1950s alarm clock, the Apollo, by Lux Mfg. Co. showing the balance spring (1) and regulator (2) …   Wikipedia

  • Pendulum clock — A pendulum clock is a clock that uses a pendulum, a swinging weight, as its timekeeping element. From its invention in 1656 by Christiaan Huygens until the 1930s, the pendulum clock was the world s most accurate timekeeper, accounting for its… …   Wikipedia

  • Clock — For other uses, see Clock (disambiguation). Timepiece redirects here. For the Kenny Rogers album, see Timepiece (album). Platform clock at King s Cross railway station, London …   Wikipedia

  • History of timekeeping devices — For thousands of years, devices have been used to measure and keep track of time. The current sexagesimal system of time measurement dates to approximately 2000 BC, in Sumer. The Ancient Egyptians divided the day into two 12 hour periods, and… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”