dock

dock
dock1
/dok/, n.
1. a landing pier.
2. the space or waterway between two piers or wharves, as for receiving a ship while in port.
3. such a waterway, enclosed or open, together with the surrounding piers, wharves, etc.
4. See dry dock.
5. a platform for loading and unloading trucks, railway freight cars, etc.
6. an airplane hangar or repair shed.
7. Also called scene dock. a place in a theater near the stage or beneath the floor of the stage for the storage of scenery.
v.t.
8. to bring (a ship or boat) into a dock; lay up in a dock.
9. to place in dry dock, as for repairs, cleaning, or painting.
10. to join (a space vehicle) with another or with a space station in outer space.
v.i.
11. to come or go into a dock or dry dock.
12. (of two space vehicles) to join together in outer space.
[1505-15; < MD doc(ke)]
dock2
/dok/, n.
1. the solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair.
2. the part of a tail left after cutting or clipping.
v.t.
3. to cut off the end of; cut short: to dock a tail.
4. to cut short the tail of: to dock a horse.
5. to deduct from the wages of, usually as a punishment: The boss docked him a day's pay.
6. to deduct from (wages): The boss docked his paycheck $20.
[1300-50; ME dok, OE -docca, in fingirdoccana (gen. pl.) finger muscles; c. Fris dok, LG docke bundle, Icel dokkur stumpy tail, MHG tocke bundle, sheaf]
dock3
/dok/, n.
1. the place in a courtroom where a prisoner is placed during trial.
2. in the dock, being tried in a court, esp. a criminal court; on trial.
[1580-90; perh. < D dok (dial. sense) cage, poultry pen, rabbit hutch]
dock4
/dok/, n.
1. any of various weedy plants belonging to the genus Rumex, of the buckwheat family, as R. obtusifolius (bitter dock) or R. acetosa (sour dock), having long taproots.
2. any of various other plants, mostly coarse weeds.
[bef. 1000; ME dokke, OE docce; c. MD docke, MHG tocke]

* * *

Any coarse weedy plant of the genus Rumex, in the buckwheat family, that has a long taproot and is sometimes used as a potherb.

Most docks are native to Europe but naturalized throughout North America. Examples include curly dock (R. crispus) and bitter dock (R. obtusifolius). The early basal leaves of patience-dock (R. patientia) are sometimes used in salads. The common weed R. acetosa is known variously as dock, common sorrel, or garden sorrel. See also sorrel.

* * *

▪ sea works
 artificially enclosed basin into which vessels are brought for inspection and repair.

      A brief treatment of docks follows. For full treatment, see harbours and sea works.

      Originally, docks were used for many purposes: as dry basins, isolated from the water by dikes or other means, they served as a place for building and repairing ships ( dry docks); as wet basins, open to the water, they provided berthing space for ships in the normal course of traffic and cargo transfer. The latter function was later rendered by another group of structures especially designed for that purpose and given different designations such as quay wall, pier, and wharf. The term dock is still often used in a generic sense to indicate all waterfront docking facilities, either dry basin or berthing structures.

      Docks used as berthing structures include quay walls, wharves, piers, and floating pontoon docks. Perhaps the oldest and most common waterfront facility for vessels, the quay wall is simply a retaining wall along the shore topped with a deck or platform, serving both as a barrier to protect the shore and as a staging area for cargo and passengers. Usually earth is placed behind the wall in order to build up the deck to the needed height above the prevailing high water level. In addition, it may be necessary to do some dredging in front of the wall to obtain the required water depth.

       portland cement, either poured in place or used as precast blocks, has supplanted stone as the leading quay-wall material. The entire system also may be built of timber or of concrete framing, with concrete or sheet steel piling used as retaining walls.

      At locations where the conformation of the shore and depth of water do not favour economical construction of a quay wall, a wharf, consisting of a trestle-mounted rectangular platform running parallel to the shoreline, and with a connecting passageway to the shore, may be constructed. Normally only the front or seaward side of a wharf is used for berthing, because the water depth and accessibility on the other three sides may not be suitable for many vessels.

      Because quay walls occupy valuable waterfront space, docking cost at a quay wall is high. A more economical expedient is the pier, which in its simplest form is merely a platform extending over the water, usually at right angles to the shoreline. Vessels can be moored to the pier, which serves as a transfer platform for cargo and passengers. A pier is composed of two main parts: the deck and its supporting system. The deck is usually built of reinforced concrete, though timber may be used. The supporting system is an assembly of beams, girders, and bearing piles, framed together to form a series of bents or trestles. The framing material may be wood, concrete, steel, or a combination of these. In some piers with concrete framing, the deck and walls are cast together to form an enclosed cellular structure. The buoyancy of such a structure greatly reduces the load on the foundations, and the interior space can be utilized for storage.

      Floating pontoon docks, of which few have been built, rise and fall with the water level. One such dock floats up or down guided by walls of sheet-steel piling driven to bedrock, which serves to anchor or moor the whole assemblage. Access to shore is provided by a trestle hinged at the shore end and resting freely on the pontoon at the other end.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Поможем написать курсовую
Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dock — dock …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Dock [1] — Dock. Unter Docks oder Dockanlagen verlieht man die Einrichtungen einer Schiffswerft oder eines Seehafens, die dazu dienen, Schiffe für Reparatur und Anstrichsarbeiten des Schiffsrumpfes trocken zu Hellen. Dieselben gliedern sich nach der Art der …   Lexikon der gesamten Technik

  • Dock [2] — Dock. Die Entwicklung der Dockanlagen zum Trockenstellen von Seeschiffen für Reparatur und Anstrichsarbeiten hat sich infolge des in den letzten Jahren schnellen Anwachsens der Schiffsabmessungen der Ozeanriesen vornehmlich auf eine Steigerung… …   Lexikon der gesamten Technik

  • dock — [ dɔk ] n. m. • 1826; 1671 en parlant de l Angleterre; dogue 1679; mot angl., du néerl. docke 1 ♦ Vaste bassin entouré de quais et destiné au chargement et au déchargement des navires. « des grands docks rayonnants où les transatlantiques ont l… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Dock — Dock, n. [Akin to D. dok; of uncertain origin; cf. LL. doga ditch, L. doga ditch, L. doga sort of vessel, Gr. ? receptacle, fr. ? to receive.] 1. An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, used for the reception of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dock — Dock, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Docked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Docking}.] [See {Dock} a tail. Cf. W. tociaw, and twciaw, to dock, clip.] 1. to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dock — steht für: Dock (Schifffahrt), eine Anlage (Trocken /Schwimmdock) zur Aufnahme und Trockenlegung von Schiffen (oder im Schiffsbau siehe: Baudock) Dock (Technik), den Teil einer Kupplungseinrichtung Dock (Software), ein Bestandteil der grafischen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • dock — n [Dutch dialect docke dok pen, cage]: the place in a criminal court where a prisoner stands or sits during trial compare bar, bench, jury box, sidebar …   Law dictionary

  • Dock — Dock: Das im Hochd. zuerst im 18. Jh. als Dok, Docke bezeugte Wort, das eine »Anlage zum Trockenstellen und Ausbessern von Schiffen« bezeichnet, ist aus dem Niederl. oder Engl. entlehnt worden. Niederl. dok, mniederl. doc‹ke›, engl. dock, älter… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • dock — Ⅰ. dock [1] ► NOUN 1) an enclosed area of water in a port for the loading, unloading, and repair of ships. 2) (also loading dock) a platform for loading trucks or goods trains. ► VERB 1) (with reference to a ship) come or bring into a dock. 2) …   English terms dictionary

  • Dock — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Dock en los sistemas operativos de Apple Macintosh (versiones desde Mac OS X 10.0 en adelante) es la barra de accesos directos, muy similar a la usada en el entorno KDE. Se divide en dos zonas: Donde se colocan las… …   Wikipedia Español

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”