descrying

  • 1Descrying — Descry De*scry , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Descried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Descrying}.] [OE. descrien, discrien, to espy, prob. from the proclaiming of what was espied, fr. OF. descrier to proclaim, cry down, decry, F. d[ e]crier. The word was confused… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2descrying — de·scry || dɪ skraɪ v. see; see from far away; discover …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 3descrying — …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 4Descried — Descry De*scry , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Descried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Descrying}.] [OE. descrien, discrien, to espy, prob. from the proclaiming of what was espied, fr. OF. descrier to proclaim, cry down, decry, F. d[ e]crier. The word was confused… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5Descry — De*scry , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Descried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Descrying}.] [OE. descrien, discrien, to espy, prob. from the proclaiming of what was espied, fr. OF. descrier to proclaim, cry down, decry, F. d[ e]crier. The word was confused somewhat… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6descry — I. transitive verb (descried; descrying) Etymology: Middle English descrien to proclaim, reveal, from Anglo French *descrier, alteration of Old French decrier more at decry Date: 14th century 1. a. to catch sight of < I descried a sail Jonathan&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham — For other people named Charles Howard, see Charles Howard (disambiguation). The Earl of Nottingham Charles Howard c. 1620. Detail of a portrait by Daniel Mytens the Elder. Spouse(s) Catherine Carey …

    Wikipedia

  • 8Methods of divination — This article is about the numerous varieties of divination. For divination as a whole, see Divination. Innumerable methods of divination can be found around the world, and many cultures practice the same methods under different names. During the&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 9John William Miller — (1895–1978) was an American philosopher in the idealist tradition. His work appears in six published volumes, including The Paradox Cause (1978) and most recently The Task of Criticism (2006). His principal philosophical ambitions were 1) to&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 10descry — descrier, n. /di skruy /, v.t., descried, descrying. 1. to see (something unclear or distant) by looking carefully; discern; espy: The lookout descried land. 2. to discover; perceive; detect. [1250 1300; ME descrien < OF de(s)crïer to proclaim,&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 11SARTOR RESARTUS —    (i. e. the tailor patched), a book written by Carlyle at CRAIGENPUTTOCK (q.v.) in 1831, published piecemeal in Frazer s Magazine in 1833 34, and that first appeared in a book form in America, under Emerson s auspices, in 1836, but not in&#8230; …

    The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • 12descry — [dɪ skrʌɪ] verb (descries, descrying, descried) literary catch sight of. Origin ME: OFr. descrier publish, proclaim , perh. confused with obs. descry describe , var. of obs. descrive perceive …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 13discernment — n. 1. Discrimination, sagacity, shrewdness, sharpness, brightness, astuteness, acuteness, cleverness, perspicacity, ingenuity, penetration, insight, judgment, intelligence, mother wit, quick parts. 2. Discerning, perception, notice, espial,&#8230; …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 14see — vb 1 See, behold, descry, espy, view, survey, contemplate, observe, notice, remark, note, perceive, discern can all mean to take cognizance of something by physical or sometimes mental vision. See, the most general of these terms, may be used to&#8230; …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 15discernment — n acumen, perceptiveness, insight, perspicacity, perspicaciousness, penetration, awareness; discrimination, distinguishment, acuteness, keenness, sharpness; cleverness, astuteness, shrewdness, ingenuity, ingeniousness; perception, Psychol.&#8230; …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 16observance — n 1. observation, looking, viewing, witnessing; examination, taking note, scrutiny, inspection, searching; apprehension, perception, discernment, descrying, espying, espial, reconnaissance, spying, lookout. 2. observing, seeing, watching,&#8230; …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder