featherwork

featherwork

      decorative use of ornamental feathers, especially the feather mosaic needlework of Victorian England. Feathers have been used for adornment since prehistoric times. The Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi) Indians (American Indian) constructed a turkey-feather and yucca-cord fabric before their introduction to the loom. Highly advanced featherwork in Hawaii, New Zealand, Tahiti, and New Guinea had its counterpart throughout Mesoamerica and Peru. The brightly coloured feathers of parrots, toucans, jays, tanagers, and trogons were used on headdresses, cloaks, and other ceremonial garments, while more common feathers were used on mats and blankets. The feathers were overlapped and attached somewhat like shingles to a base fabric, stuck directly into wooden arrow shafts, or tied onto ceramic figures. After the Spanish conquest, bits of feathers served as backgrounds for Christian symbols. The pre-Columbian Indians also used feathers in connection with stone or metal jewelry, as did the Chinese, Polynesians, and Eskimos.

      Feathers do not appear to have been used much in Europe for ornamental purposes until the close of the 13th century. Under the early Ottoman Empire, men's turbans were decorated with feathers and jewels, and during the reign of Elizabeth I, feathers began to occupy an important place as headdress ornaments for women. Ostrich feathers were particularly liked for this purpose, although those most in demand overall have been the marabou stork feathers, aigrettes of the heron, and feathers of the various species of hummingbirds and birds of paradise. In the 18th century, featherwork was primarily crafted by amateurs as wall hangings. White poultry feathers were dyed various colours, although those of the pheasant, pigeon, peacock, guinea fowl, and black rooster were left natural. The 19th-century feather mosaics, often realistic pictures of birds covered with their correspondingly correct feathers, were commonly framed and hung like paintings. Diaper-patterned featherwork of the time was used to cover fire screens, valances, and mirror frames and to fashion muffs, masks, hats, and dress trimmings.

      Since the 20th century, commercial ostrich farms have provided plumes for feather dusters, boas, and limited millinery uses. Since the 17th century, feathers have been used in the construction of a colourful array of artificial flies for fishing, and some feathers, primarily in Latin America, are crafted into decorative floral bouquets, feather paintings, and greeting cards. Since the past indiscriminate hunting of birds for feathers has almost eliminated some species, restrictions are now enforced by the conservation agencies of many governments.

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Universalium. 2010.

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