Mon kingdom

Mon kingdom
Kingdom of the Mon people, who were powerful in Myanmar (Burma) in the 9th–11th centuries, in the 13th–16th centuries, and briefly in the mid-18th century.

By 825 they had founded their capital city, Thaton, and the city of Pegu. The Mon kingdom was defeated by the Burman kingdom of Pagan. When Pagan fell to the Mongols (1287), the Mon regained their independence and their former territory. They were defeated again in 1539. They reestablished Pegu briefly in the 18th century, but it was destroyed by Alaungpaya (see Alaungpaya dynasty) in 1757. See also Dvaravati.

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also called  Hanthawaddy Kingdom,  

      kingdom of the Mon people, who were powerful in Myanmar (Burma) from the 9th to the 11th and from the 13th to the 16th century and for a brief period in the mid-18th century. The Mon migrated southward from western China and settled in the Chao Phraya River basin (of southern Thailand) about the 6th century AD. Their early kingdoms, Dvaravati and Haripunjaya (qq.v.), had ties with the ancient Cambodian kingdom of Funan and with China and were also strongly influenced by Khmer civilization.

      After the Mon moved westward into the Irrawaddy River delta of southern Myanmar in the ensuing centuries, they acquired Theravāda Buddhism, their state religion, from Ceylon and South India, and they adopted the Indian Pāli script. By 825 they had firmly established themselves in southern and southeastern Myanmar and founded the cities of Pegu and Thaton.

      About the same period, southward-migrating Burmans took over lands in central Myanmar and established the kingdom of Pagan. In 1057 Pagan defeated the Mon kingdom, capturing the Mon capital of Thaton and carrying off 30,000 Mon captives to Pagan. This event was to prove culturally decisive for the Burmans because the Mon captives included many Theravāda Buddhist monks, who converted the Burmans to Theravāda Buddhism; Pāli replaced Sanskrit as the language of the sacred literature, and the Burmans adopted the Mon alphabet.

      After the fall of Pagan (1287) to the invading Mongols, the Mon, under Wareru, regained their independence and captured Martaban and Pegu, thus virtually controlling their previously held territory. The next 200 years witnessed incessant warfare between the Mon and the Burmans, but the Mon managed to retain their independence until 1539, when they came under the domination of Toungoo Myanmar. In the mid-18th century the Mon rose in rebellion and reestablished their kingdom of Pegu, but it lasted only some 10 years. The Burmans triumphed permanently over the Mon when their leader Alaungpaya razed Pegu in 1757. Many of the Mon were killed, while others fled to Siam (now Thailand). The Mon are still centred in southeastern Myanmar, though their numbers are small compared to those of the ethnic Burmans.

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Universalium. 2010.

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