marginal utility

marginal utility
the extra utility or satisfaction derived by a consumer from the consumption of the last unit of a commodity.
[1920-25]

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In economics, the additional satisfaction or benefit (utility) that a consumer derives from buying an additional unit of a commodity or service.

The law of diminishing utility implies that utility or benefit is inversely related to the number of units already owned. For example, the marginal utility of one slice of bread offered to a family that has five slices will be great, since the family will be less hungry and the difference between five and six is proportionally significant. An extra slice offered to a family that has 30 slices will have less marginal utility, since the difference between 30 and 31 is proportionally smaller and the family's appetite may be satisfied by what it already has. The concept grew out of attempts by 19th-century economists to explain the fundamental economic reality of price.

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 in economics, the additional satisfaction or benefit (utility) that a consumer derives from buying an additional unit of a commodity or service. The concept implies that the utility or benefit to a consumer of an additional unit of a product is inversely related to the number of units of that product he already owns.

      Marginal utility can be illustrated by the following example. The marginal utility of one slice of bread offered to a family that has only seven slices will be great, since the family will be that much less hungry and the difference between seven and eight is proportionally significant. An extra slice of bread offered to a family that has 30 slices, however, will have less marginal utility, since the difference between 30 and 31 is proportionally smaller and the family's hunger has been allayed by what it had already. Thus, the marginal utility to a buyer of a product decreases as he purchases more and more of that product, until the point is reached at which he has no need at all of additional units. The marginal utility is then zero.

      The concept of marginal utility grew out of attempts by 19th-century economists to analyze and explain the fundamental economic reality of price. These economists believed that price was partly determined by a commodity's utility—that is, the degree to which it satisfies a consumer's needs and desires. This definition of utility, however, led to a paradox when applied to prevailing price relations.

      The economists observed that the value of diamonds was far greater than that of bread, even though bread, being essential to the continuation of life, had far greater utility than did diamonds, which were merely ornaments. This problem, known as the paradox of value, was solved by the application of the concept of marginal utility. Because diamonds are scarce and the demand for them was great, the possession of additional units was a high priority. This meant their marginal utility was high, and consumers were willing to pay a comparatively high price for them. Bread is much less valuable only because it is much less scarce, and the buyers of bread possess enough to satisfy their most pressing need for it. Additional purchases of bread beyond people's appetite for it will be of decreasing benefit or utility and will eventually lose all utility beyond the point at which hunger is completely satisfied.

      The concept of marginal utility was augmented in the 20th century by the method of analysis known as indifference analysis (see indifference curve).

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Universalium. 2010.

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