feeling

feeling
feelingly, adv.feelingness, n.
/fee"ling/, n.
1. the function or the power of perceiving by touch.
2. physical sensation not connected with sight, hearing, taste, or smell.
3. a particular sensation of this kind: a feeling of warmth; a feeling of pain.
4. the general state of consciousness considered independently of particular sensations, thoughts, etc.
5. a consciousness or vague awareness: a feeling of inferiority.
6. an emotion or emotional perception or attitude: a feeling of joy; a feeling of sorrow.
7. capacity for emotion, esp. compassion: to have great feeling for the sufferings of others.
8. a sentiment; attitude; opinion: The general feeling was in favor of the proposal.
9. feelings, sensibilities; susceptibilities: to hurt one's feelings.
10. fine emotional endowment.
11. (in music, art, etc.)
a. emotion or sympathetic perception revealed by an artist in his or her work: a poem without feeling.
b. the general impression conveyed by a work: a landscape painting with a spacious feeling.
c. sympathetic appreciation, as of music: to play with feeling.
adj.
12. sensitive; sentient.
13. readily affected by emotion; sympathetic: a feeling heart.
14. indicating or characterized by emotion: a feeling reply to the charge.
[1125-75; ME; see FEEL, -ING1, -ING2]
Syn. 5. FEELING, EMOTION, PASSION, SENTIMENT refer to pleasurable or painful sensations experienced when one is stirred to sympathy, anger, fear, love, grief, etc. FEELING is a general term for a subjective point of view as well as for specific sensations: to be guided by feeling rather than by facts; a feeling of sadness, of rejoicing. EMOTION is applied to an intensified feeling: agitated by emotion.
PASSION is strong or violent emotion, often so overpowering that it masters the mind or judgment: stirred to a passion of anger. SENTIMENT is a mixture of thought and feeling, esp. refined or tender feeling: Recollections are often colored by sentiment. 6. sympathy, empathy, tenderness, sensitivity, sentiment. 12. emotional, tender. 13. impassioned, passionate.
Ant. 5, 6. apathy. 12. cold.

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Introduction

      in psychology, the perception of events within the body, closely related to emotion. The term feeling is a verbal noun denoting the action of the verb to feel, which derives etymologically from the Middle English verb felen, “to perceive by touch, by palpation.” It soon came to mean, more generally, to perceive through those senses that are not referred to any special organ. As the known special organs of sense were the ones mediating the perception of the external world, the verb to feel came also to mean the perception of events within the body. Psychologists disagree on the use of the term feeling. The preceding definition accords with that of the American psychologist R.S. Woodworth (Woodworth, Robert S.), who defines the problem of feeling and emotion as that of the individual's “internal state.” Many psychologists, however, still follow the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (Kant, Immanuel) in equating feeling to states of pleasantness and unpleasantness, known in psychology as affect.

      Because of the essentially internal, subjective nature of feeling, its study has been concerned with two distinct problems—namely, how an event is perceived and what the perceived event is.

Study of internal sensitivity.
      At the turn of the 20th century, German psychologists Wilhelm Wundt (Wundt, Wilhelm) and Edward Titchener (Titchener, Edward Bradford) suggested that the elementary psychological states that make up consciousness, such as sensations, images, and feelings, can be observed and analyzed by experimentation. In 1846 the German physiologist E.H. Weber (Weber, Ernst Heinrich) distinguished only two senses in addition to sight, hearing, taste, and smell, whereas the American neurologist C.J. Herrick in 1931 distinguished 23 classes of receptors involved in such additional senses. Much information has been gained on the perception of relatively simple localized stimulation within the body. It is known, for instance, that moderate increases in temperatures of the skin are perceived as warmth, moderate decreases as cold, checkerboard combinations of moderate increases and decreases as heat, and intense increases as pain. Comparable information has not been gained, however, on the perception of such presumably widespread and heterogeneous internal states as the emotions.

Perception of emotions.
      A milestone in the psychology of feeling was the American psychologist William James's (James, William) theory of emotion, which held that physiological changes precede emotion. Subsequent evidence indicates that the theory is essentially correct in that there is an internal sensory basis for feeling. More recent work has demonstrated an interaction between physiological arousal and cognition in determining emotional expression.

      If emotion is in part a perception initiated by bodily responses, it is obviously desirable to know what these responses are. The best single answer to this question came from the work of the American physiologist W.B. Cannon (Cannon, Walter Bradford), who in a long series of experiments was able to show that the major emotions involve excitation of the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system and that such excitation, because of the diffuse conduction, gives rise to a widespread set of specific responses of smooth muscles and glands—increase in heart rate, increase in blood pressure, inhibition of peristaltic movements, increased perspiration, and many others. Compare emotion.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • feeling — n 1 sensibility, *sensation, sense Analogous words: reacting or reaction, behaving or behavior (see corresponding verbs at ACT): responsiveness (see corresponding adjective at TENDER): sensitiveness, susceptibility (see corresponding adjectives… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • feeling — [fēl′iŋ] adj. [ME feling: see FEEL & ING] full of or expressing emotion or sensitivity; sympathetic n. 1. that one of the senses by which sensations of contact, pressure, temperature, and pain are transmitted through the skin; sense of touch 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • Feeling — Feel ing, n. 1. The sense by which the mind, through certain nerves of the body, perceives external objects, or certain states of the body itself; that one of the five senses which resides in the general nerves of sensation distributed over the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Feeling B — Жанр Панк рок Годы 1983 1993 2007 Страна …   Википедия

  • feeling — UK US /ˈfiːlɪŋ/ noun ► [C or U] something that you feel with your body or mind: »I had a funny feeling in my stomach before my interview. »The redundancies created bad feeling between the new manager and the remaining staff. ► [C, usually… …   Financial and business terms

  • Feeling B — était l un des premiers groupes de punk de République démocratique allemande (l Allemagne de l Est). Il a été fondé à Berlin en 1983 et a commencé dans une scène punk underground. Quelque temps après, la popularité de Feeling B a énormément… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • feeling — s.n. (Anglicism) Stare afectivă; intuiţie afectivă. ♦ (muz.) Sentiment, simţire, sensibilitate. [pron. filin. / < engl. feeling] Trimis de LauraGellner, 17.06.2007. Sursa: DN  FEELING FÍLIN/ s. n. stare afectivă; intuiţie afectivă. ♢ (muz.)… …   Dicționar Român

  • feeling — /ˈfilin(g), ingl. ˈfiːlɪŋ/ [vc. ingl., da to feel «sentire»] s. m. inv. 1. intesa, sintonia, simpatia 2. compassione, comprensione, partecipazione. SFUMATURE feeling sensazione Feeling è la corrente di simpatia, la sintonia che si instaura in… …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • feeling — [n1] sensation, especially of touch activity, awareness, consciousness, enjoyment, excitability, excitation, excitement, feel, innervation, motility, motor response, pain, perceiving, perception, pleasure, reaction, receptivity, reflex,… …   New thesaurus

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