escalator

escalator
/es"keuh lay'teuhr/, n.
1. Also called moving staircase, moving stairway. a continuously moving stairway on an endless loop for carrying passengers up or down.
2. a means of rising or descending, increasing or decreasing, etc., esp. by stages: the social escalator.
adj.
4. of, pertaining to, or included in an escalator clause: The union demands escalator protection of wages.
[1895-1900, Amer.; formerly a trademark; perh. ESCAL(ADE) + (ELEV)ATOR]

* * *

Moving staircase used as transportation between floors or levels in stores, airports, subways, and other mass pedestrian areas.

The name was first applied to a moving stairway shown at the Paris Exposition of 1900. Modern escalators are electrically powered, driven by chain and sprocket, and held in place by two tracks. As the treads approach a landing, they pass through a comb device; a switch cuts off power if an object becomes jammed between comb and treads.

* * *

 moving staircase used as transportation between floors or levels in subways, buildings, and other mass pedestrian areas.

      An inclined belt, invented by Jesse W. Reno of the United States in 1891, provided transportation for passengers riding on cleats attached to the belt, which was inclined at an angle of 25°; the handrail was stationary, but an improved version with a moving handrail was introduced the same year.

      The name escalator was first applied to a moving stairway shown at the Paris Exposition of 1900. Originally a trademark of the Otis Elevator Company, the word was adjudged in 1949 to have become public property through popular use.

      Modern escalators are usually inclined at 30°, limited in rise to about 60 feet (18 m), with floor-to-floor rise of about 12 feet (3.5 m). They are electrically powered, driven by chain and sprocket, and held in the proper plane by two tracks. As the treads approach the landing, they pass through a comb device; a deflection switch is actuated to cut off power if an object becomes jammed between the tread and the comb.

      Escalators move at a rate of up to 120 feet (36 m) per minute; larger types have a capacity of 6,000 passengers per hour. If a chain breaks, the release of tension stops the escalator. A safety switch also halts the device if a handrail is broken or comes loose or if a side panel is deflected.

      Moving ramps or sidewalks, sometimes called travelators, are specialized forms of escalators developed to carry people and materials horizontally or along slight inclines. Ramps may have either solid or jointed treads or a continuous belt. Ramps can move at any angle of up to 15°; beyond this incline the slope becomes too steep and escalators are favoured.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Игры ⚽ Поможем написать курсовую

Look at other dictionaries:

  • escalator — ESCALATÓR, escalatoare, s.n. Scară rulantă utilizata pentru circulaţia oamenilor (în metrouri, în magazine etc.). – Din fr., engl. escalator. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DEX 98  ESCALATÓR s. v. scară rulantă. Trimis de siveco,… …   Dicționar Român

  • escalator — [ ɛskalatɔr ] n. m. • 1948; mot angl. amér. (1900), de to escal(ade) et (elev)ator « ascenseur » ♦ Anglic. Escalier mécanique (recomm. offic.). ● Escalator nom masculin (américain escalade, escalade, et …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • escalator — ☆ escalator [es′kə lāt΄ər ] n. [coined as a trademark (1895) < ESCALA(DE) + tor, as in (ELEVA)TOR] 1. a moving stairway consisting of treads linked in an endless belt, used in department stores, subway stations, etc. 2. ESCALATOR CLAUSE …   English World dictionary

  • Escalator — Es ca*la tor, n. [NL. Cf. {Escalade}.] A stairway or incline arranged like an endless belt so that the steps or treads ascend or descend continuously, and one stepping upon it is carried up or down; originally a trade term, which has become the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • escalator — A mechanism by which the successful performance of management reflected in growth in the value of a company is rewarded by progressively increasing their share of the equity. Easyform Glossary of Law Terms. UK law terms …   Law dictionary

  • escalator — 1900, Amer.Eng., trade name of an Otis Elevator Co. moving staircase, coined from ESCALADE (Cf. escalade) + ator in ELEVATOR (Cf. elevator). Figurative use is from 1927 …   Etymology dictionary

  • escalator — ► NOUN ▪ a moving staircase consisting of a circulating belt of steps driven by a motor. ORIGIN from ESCALADE(Cf. ↑E), on the pattern of elevator …   English terms dictionary

  • Escalator — For the album by Sam Gopal, see Escalator (album). Escalators in a Copenhagen Metro station, Denmark, 2007 Escalator in action, 2011 An e …   Wikipedia

  • escalator — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ down, up ▪ kids running up a down escalator VERB + ESCALATOR ▪ ride (AmE), take, use …   Collocations dictionary

  • Escalator — Escalier mécanique Escalier mécanique dans le Métro de Copenhague …   Wikipédia en Français

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”